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1349 posts
  • Domestic policy

President Trump again name-checks Chicago in a tweet decrying gun violence in the city. 

The day before was Chicago's deadliest of the year so far, according to data from the Chicago Tribune. Seven people were shot and killed, including a woman who was eight months pregnant.

Trump also sounded off about violence in Chicago a few days after his inauguration, tweeting that if the city didn't solve its "horrible 'carnage,' " he'd "send in the feds."

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  • The economy
  • Fox News

President Trump met with two dozen chief executives of manufacturing companies and vowed to help restore factory jobs he says have been lost to foreign competition.

Yet some of the CEOs suggested that there were still plenty of openings but too few qualified people to fill them. They urged the White House to support vocational training for the high-tech skills that today's manufacturers increasingly require.

White House officials said that Trump supports efforts to increase training for factory jobs, but they didn't provide details.

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  • Immigration
  • On the media
  • Politics and polls

The Hill reported that its poll was conducted online and surveyed 2,148 registered voters between Feb. 11 and 13: "The partisan breakdown is 39 percent Democrat, 30 percent Republican, 27 percent independent and 5 percent other. The Harvard–Harris Poll survey is a collaboration of the Harvard Center for American Political Studies and The Harris Poll."

"There is no neat definition of 'sanctuary city,' but in general, cities that adopt the designation seek to offer political support or practical protections to people who are in the country illegally.

President Trump tweeted about his visit to the National Museum of African American History and Culture, which took place during Black History Month, early the morning after the visit.

During the visit, Trump made his first direct comments denouncing anti-Semitism, an issue he had declined to directly address for weeks.

“The anti-Semitic threats targeting our Jewish community and community centers are horrible, and are painful, and a very sad reminder of the work that still must be done to root out hate and prejudice and evil,” Trump said while addressing reporters at the museum.

  • Accolades
  • Politics and polls

Democrats are gathering in Atlanta this week to choose their new national party chair. With the ballots going out, Trump weighs in on the leading contender with a self-referential tweet.

Ellison, who represents Minneapolis and some of its suburbs, said in an interview on ABC's "This Week" in July 2015 that Trump had momentum and could make it all the way to the White House.

"Anyone who is terrified of the possibility of President Trump, better vote, better get active, better get involved," Ellison said. "Because this man has got some momentum and we better get ready for the fact that he might be leading the Republican ticket."

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  • On the media
  • Insults
  • Accolades
  • Voter fraud

Outside President Trump's Florida resort, protesters against the Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipeline projects outnumbered Trump supporters, according to the Palm Beach Post

The news that dominated headlines on this day was about North Korea's launch of a ballistic missile.

Earlier, Trump praised an advisor for appearances on Sunday morning news shows.

  • Healthcare
  • On the media
  • Domestic policy
  • North Korea
  • His cabinet
  • Accolades

President Trump names Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster as his new national security advisor, replacing Michael Flynn, who was forced to resign last week.

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  • Family matters

It wasn’t the first time Trump has tweeted about a company (see: Boeing, Carrier and U.S. automakers) but ethics experts said the public comments about his daughter’s business raise conflict-of-interest concerns and even carry an implicit threat. 

The tweet from his personal account was also retweeted by the official @POTUS account.

  • Immigration
  • On the media
  • Insults
  • Terrorism

President Trump’s mysterious reference to a frightening security episode in Sweden prompted a deluge of online ridicule —  and an official request for an explanation Sunday from a Nordic country that prides itself on tranquility.

Swedish authorities reported no terror-related incident or other episode involving large-scale violence at the time Trump made his remarks. 

The Twitter hashtags #lastnightinsweden and #swedenincident blew up online, yielding posts including an image of a cozy farmhouse set in an idyllic-looking snowscape, an array of riffs on complicated IKEA furniture-assembly instructions and an assortment of tweets pretending to darkly implicate Sweden’s perhaps best-known export, the ’70s pop sensation ABBA.