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1349 posts
  • On the media
  • The economy
  • Fox News

The stock market has never been higher, and President Trump would like more people to pay attention.

Trump's tweet referred to the Dow Jones industrial average. The 18,000 figure he cited, though, was inaccurate: The Dow closed at 19,890.94 six months ago. It was at 18,332.74 on election day, which was nearly nine months ago. And analysts say it would be inaccurate to give Trump full credit for the market's records, at least those set during the last few months.

"Trump obviously is taking credit for a lot of this, as almost any president would do, but the things that affect the market right now aren't things that have been put in place over the last six months," said Randy Frederick, vice president of trading and derivatives at the Schwab Center for Financial Research.

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  • On the media

President Trump may be trying for a reset in the West Wing, but he is making clear that he is not changing his Twitter habit.

Trump's tweet came one day after retired Marine Gen. John F. Kelly took over as Trump's new chief of staff. Tapped to bring order to the chaotic West Wing, Kelly quickly made his presence known Monday — ousting newly appointed communications director Anthony Scaramucci and revising the command structure so that all senior staffers report to him.

Those moves were praised Monday by Trump allies and lawmakers, who expressed hope that Kelly would help stem internal conflicts and advance a policy agenda after six months of tumult. But less clear is how much control Kelly will have over Trump's predilection for sowing conflict and making off-the-cuff comments on social media.

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President Trump tweeted Monday evening that it was a "great day" at the White House.

Trump's comment came as he continued to express frustration over the collapse Friday in the Senate of a bill to repeal the nation's healthcare law.

Trump urged Republican senators in tweets over the weekend to try again to push through legislation to roll back the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, but Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has said that he plans to move on to other matters.

  • Healthcare
  • Domestic policy
  • Politics and polls

Reeling from the failure to repeal the Affordable Care Act, President Trump now threatens to block federal funding that lawmakers and their staff rely on to help buy health insurance.

Trump's threats are not empty. The administration could simply stop the payments – which are provided to Capitol Hill lawmakers and staff much the way many employers help pay employees' monthly insurance premiums –  by dashing off a new federal regulation. 

But the easy attack on lawmakers skims over what many say was a complicated, but fair-minded, compromise made during the Obamacare debates several years ago.

  • The economy

Hoping to turn the page on a tumultuous opening chapter to his presidency, President Trump insisted that there was "no chaos" in his White House on Monday as he swore in retired Marine Gen. John F. Kelly as his second chief of staff.

Not long after, Anthony Scaramucci, who shocked many with his profane outburst last week against then-Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, was out as White House communications director.

Trump on Friday ousted Priebus as chief of staff and turned to Kelly, who he hopes will bring military discipline to an administration weighed down by a stalled legislative agenda, infighting among West Wing aides and a stack of investigations.

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  • Healthcare
  • Domestic policy
  • Politics and polls

A pair of prominent lawmakers urged President Trump on Sunday not to sabotage the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, in the wake of failed Republican efforts to scrap his predecessor’s signature legislative achievement.

But Trump urged GOP senators to try again to push through some version of repealing and replacing the law, even though Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said last week it was time to move on to other matters.

Prior to heading out for a day at his Virginia golf property, Trump tweeted that Republican senators should press ahead with efforts to scrap Obamacare – a day after he tauntingly exhorted them not to be "quitters" in the quest for a legislative victory for him.

  • On the media
  • Politics and polls

President Trump suggested that he deserves the majority of the credit for winning the 2016 election.

Trump tweeted Saturday that he'd read reports about "all of the 'geniuses' who were so instrumental" in his surprise Nov. 8 win.

"Problem is, most don't exist," he wrote, adding the hashtag "Fake News."

President Trump aired his frustration with China in a string of tweets Saturday.

The day before, North Korea had launched its second intercontinental ballistic missile in less than a month, according to Pentagon officials.

China is North Korea's most important ally and trading partner, and Trump has suggested the country could play a key role in pressuring Pyongyang to end its nuclear program.

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President Trump tweeted that the U.S. stock market is up nearly 20% since he was elected.

The Dow Jones industrial average is up about 19% since Trump was elected on Nov. 8, 2016. The Standard & Poor's 500 index has climbed 15.5% and the Nasdaq composite has surged nearly 23%.

The Commerce Department announced Friday that the U.S. economy expanded this spring at a solid 2.6% annual rate.

  • Healthcare
  • Domestic policy
  • Russia
  • Politics and polls
  • Fox News

President Trump was back on Twitter early Saturday morning, closing out a chaotic and disappointing week with one of his signature online rants. 

He took no responsibility for the collapse of the GOP effort to repeal and replace Obamacare, instead suggesting Senate leaders are weak for refusing to change filibuster rules.

(Even with the change in rules Trump is calling for, there were still not enough GOP votes in the Senate to repeal the Affordable Care Act.)