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1349 posts
  • His schedule
  • Accolades
  • Domestic policy
  • The economy
  • Politics and polls

President Trump made an overt pitch Wednesday for Democrats to support his tax overhaul plan, singling out a North Dakota Democratic senator whose vote would be prized by the White House.

Delivering an outdoor speech to a crowd of hundreds at an oil refinery, Trump called for the state's governor and congressional delegation to join him onstage, including Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, the only statewide elected Democrat in heavily Republican North Dakota.

"Everybody's saying: What's she doing up here?" Trump said of the first-term senator, adding, "I hope we'll have your support," and calling her "a good woman."

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  • His schedule
  • Domestic policy
  • The economy

President Trump headed Wednesday to North Dakota, where he was slated to deliver a speech on tax reform.

Before departing Washington, Trump tweeted about the need for such reform, complaining that the United States is "the highest taxed nation in the world" and promising to change that.

Trump has complained before about the U.S. tax burden, but it is actually one of the lowest among the 32 developed and large emerging-market economies tracked by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

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  • Accolades
  • Domestic policy

President Trump tweeted that he was "closely" watching Hurricane Irma, one of the most powerful Atlantic hurricanes, as it set a wild, wind-churned course toward Puerto Rico, with the U.S. mainland in its sights, likely over the weekend.

The monster hurricane made landfall in the Caribbean, where it was blamed for at least four deaths.

The president tweeted Wednesday that his “team” was ready in Florida, adding: “No rest for the weary!”

  • Foreign policy
  • North Korea

For as long as North Korea couldn't strike the United States with nuclear weapons, U.S. allies Japan and South Korea felt assured that the promise of an overwhelming American military response would deter the communist country from launching attacks.

Pyongyang's emerging capabilities are upsetting all calculations. The North this weekend exploded its strongest-ever nuclear weapon and in July tested a pair of intercontinental ballistic missiles that might soon be able to threaten the entire American mainland.

The North's technological progress is adding to insecurities compounded by President Trump's sometimes lukewarm support for defending U.S. allies under his "America first" agenda.

  • Immigration
  • Domestic policy
  • Politics and polls
  • Obama

President Trump on Tuesday took action to strip away protections from deportation for roughly 800,000 people brought into the country illegally as children, giving Congress six months to write a law to resolve their plight.

Trump wrestled with the decision, he and his aides said, but ultimately decided to keep his campaign promise and let Congress resolve the issue. Even before his decision was public, Trump started the day with a tweet that signaled his intent and put the onus on lawmakers: 

Trump’s long-awaited decision to get rid of the Obama-era program for so-called Dreamers fit a pattern of his young presidency: As with other signature campaign promises on infrastructure, tax reform and health insurance, he offered little guidance on what exactly he wanted done and left it to a polarized Congress to fill in the details.

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  • Accolades

President Trump wished the public a happy Labor Day Monday in a tweet.

The tweet followed North Korea's test of what it claimed was a hydrogen bomb over the weekend.

Trump spoke Monday with South Korean President Moon Jae-in and sought to ratchet up pressure on North Korea, the White House said.

  • His schedule

Donald Trump's presidency has been defined largely by political crises of his own making, from his decision to fire FBI Director James B. Comey to his comments after racial violence in Charlottesville, Va. It was inevitable that circumstances outside his reach would complicate his tenure.

And now they have, raising the question of how he will handle a double-barreled pair of crises — the growing threat from North Korea and the recovery and relief efforts for hundreds of thousands of Americans caught in epic floods in Texas and Louisiana.

Trump appeared to acknowledge the importance of the upcoming week Monday night in a tweet.

  • Foreign policy
  • His schedule
  • North Korea
  • The economy

President Trump and his national security advisors planned to meet Sunday to discuss options after North Korea's weekend test of what it claimed was a hydrogen bomb.

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a morning statement that the president was monitoring the situation closely.

Trump later suggested in a tweet that he would consider blocking trade with countries doing business with Pyongyang  — a threat principally aimed at China, which is North Korea's chief trading partner.

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  • Foreign policy
  • North Korea

President Trump on Sunday called North Korea a “rogue nation” and a threat to the United States, hours after Pyongyang announced it had detonated a thermonuclear device, its sixth and most powerful nuclear test to date.

The nuclear test was a vivid show of defiance against Trump, who warned last month he’d bring “fire and fury” against North Korea if it continued to threaten the U.S.

In tweets responding to the North Korean move, Trump seemed to put the onus on China to rein in the government of Kim Jong Un.

  • His schedule
  • Accolades
  • The economy
  • Politics and polls
  • The Clintons

President Trump returned Saturday night to the White House after visiting Texas and Louisiana to meet with victims of Hurricane Harvey.

His Twitter finger appeared to be itchy.

In the first of three tweets sent minutes apart, the president touted a rise in the Institute for Supply Management's manufacturing index, which measures how quickly U.S. factories are expanding.