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It’s the election America just can’t quit.

One year later, much of the country continues to obsess over Trump vs. Clinton, as though still seated on the couch, eyes agoggle, watching the final decisive returns trickle in from Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.

This is not normal.

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Gov.-elect Ralph Northam, right, and Lt. Gov.-elect Justin Fairfax greet supporters at a Democratic election night rally in Fairfax, Va.
Gov.-elect Ralph Northam, right, and Lt. Gov.-elect Justin Fairfax greet supporters at a Democratic election night rally in Fairfax, Va. (Win McNamee / Getty Images)

Democrat Ralph Northam swept to victory in the race for Virginia governor on Tuesday in a night of political retaliation against President Trump that also saw a Democratic gubernatorial win in New Jersey.

Northam’s victory sketched out a path that Democratic strategists hope other candidates can follow in next year’s contest for control of Congress.

He piled up big margins in the suburbs of northern Virginia, the most populous and voter-rich area of the state, where animosity toward the president runs deep. At the same time, Northam, the lieutenant governor, also fared better than many Democrats have in more rural areas, preventing the Republican candidate, Ed Gillespie, from running up the score in the southern and western areas of the state, where Trump trounced Hillary Clinton one year ago.

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Democrats staked an early lead Tuesday night in their bid to control the Washington state Senate and establish single-party reign over the West Coast.

Manka Dhingra, a King County prosecutor, pulled ahead 55% to 45% over Republican Jinyoung Englund, a former congressional aide, in initial returns.

Although Democrats claimed victory, final results in Washington's all-mail election will not be known for several days.

  • White House
A North Korean army officer looks out at the Demilitarized Zone.
A North Korean army officer looks out at the Demilitarized Zone. (Wong Maye-E / Associated Press)

President Trump tried to make a dramatic surprise visit to the highly fortified border between North and South Korea on Tuesday, but his helicopter had to turn back because of bad weather, his spokeswoman said.

Trump intended to meet South Korean President Moon Jae-in and stand together at the Demilitarized Zone in a "historic moment" for the presidents of the two nations, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders told reporters traveling with the president.

But fog prevented Trump's helicopter from making the trip, she said. The president's retinue waited about an hour to make a second attempt, but the fog got worse instead of better.  

Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions is sworn in during his confirmation hearing in January.
Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions is sworn in during his confirmation hearing in January. (Molly Riley / AFP/Getty Images)

Federal prosecutors have decided to drop a case against a woman arrested in the U.S. Capitol after she laughed during the confirmation hearing for Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions.

Desiree Ali-Fairooz, an activist with the Code Pink organization, was one of three protesters arrested by Capitol Police during the opening statements of Sessions’ January hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee.  In court filings, prosecutors alleged she let out bursts of laughter after Sen. Richard C. Shelby (R-Ala.) praised Sessions during his opening remarks.

She was convicted of a misdemeanor in District of Columbia court, but a judge threw out the conviction in July and ordered a new trial. After Ali-Fairooz rejected a plea deal, the U.S. attorney's office in Washington continued to press the case. But prosecutors filed a notice dismissing the charges on Monday, a week before the second trial was to begin.

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People visit crosses representing the victims killed at a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas. (Larry W. Smith / EPA / Shutterstock)
People visit crosses representing the victims killed at a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas. (Larry W. Smith / EPA / Shutterstock)

In the aftermath of the mass shooting at a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, the second-ranking Senate Republican said Tuesday that Congress would begin working on legislation to tighten background-check compliances for gun purchases.

The proposal announced by Sen. John Cornyn of Texas, the GOP whip, could become one of the rare times congressional Republicans have responded with legislative action following a shooting that caused mass casualties. Twenty-six people were killed when a gunman opened fire on Sunday church services.

"Obviously if things like this can happen in spite of the law, then we need to look at that and try to fix it as best we can," Cornyn said. "This seems to be an area where there is bipartisan support."

The House Ways and Means Committee.
The House Ways and Means Committee. (Chip Somodevilla)

Republicans on the House Ways and Means Committee on Tuesday defeated a Democratic attempt to restore the full deduction for state and local taxes, which would be scaled back in the GOP tax overhaul legislation.

The Republican bill would eliminate the deduction for state and local income and sales taxes while allowing individuals to continue deducting local property taxes up to $10,000.

Under the legislation, businesses still would be allowed to deduct all their state and local taxes.

  • Economy

Americans increasingly say jobs are plentiful in their communities, but they continue to worry that their incomes are lagging, according to a new poll released Tuesday.

As with most questions, partisanship strongly shapes how people see the economy. Republican views about the availability of good jobs suddenly improved with President Trump's election, while Democrats' views soured, new figures from the nonpartisan Pew Research Center showed

Even allowing for that, however, the public view of the job picture is at its best level since 2001, Pew found.

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Speaker of the House Paul D. Ryan commented on the Texas shooting that killed 26 people Sunday, calling for enforcement of existing gun laws. 

He also called for prayers for the victims. 

(AFP)

President Trump said that even with tighter vetting of gun buyers, "there would have been no difference" for those killed in the mass shooting at a South Texas church on Sunday.

Trump made the comments during a news conference in Seoul with South Korean President Moon Jae-in in response to a question about why his promised “extreme vetting” for visa applicants shouldn’t also be applied to gun purchases. 

"If you did what you're suggesting, there would have been no difference three days ago, and you might not have had that very brave person who happened to have a gun in his truck and shoot him, and hit him and neutralize him," Trump said, referring to a neighbor who chased down the gunman.