Lifestyle

Recipe: Tomato-herb panzanella

Total time: About 1 hour

Servings: 4

Note: Black tomatoes can be found at farmers markets (Jaime Farms) and selected grocery stores; you can substitute other medium heirloom or on-the-vine tomatoes.

1/4 cup good-quality olive oil, plus extra for drizzling

4 cups country white bread, preferably stale, cut into 1/4 -inch cubes

Sea salt

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 small red chile, minced

4 medium black tomatoes, coarsely chopped

1 1/4 cups halved grape and/or cherry tomatoes, assorted colors

1/2 cup finely diced red onion

2 tablespoons red wine vinegar

Pinch of freshly ground black pepper

1 tablespoon coarsely chopped oregano

1/4 cup coarsely chopped basil

1/4 cup coarsely chopped parsley

1 cup watercress

1. In a large sauté pan, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the bread cubes and salt and then toast until golden, tossing frequently for even cooking, about 10 minutes.

2. Add the minced garlic and chile and toss to coat the bread. Continue cooking for about 2 minutes, making sure the mixture doesn't get too brown. Remove from the heat.

3. In a large bowl, mix together the tomatoes, onion, vinegar and black pepper. Add the bread mixture and toss to coat. Let sit for about 30 minutes for flavors to combine.

4. Add the oregano, basil, parsley and watercress to the salad, toss. Check for seasoning, adding more salt if desired. Serve immediately, with a drizzle of olive oil.

Each serving: 270 calories; 5 grams protein; 30 grams carbohydrates; 4 grams fiber; 4 grams fat; 15 grams saturated fat; 0 cholesterol; 257 mg. sodium.

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
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