One evening late last year I was on my computer at home when I heard a woman yelling. Well, not just yelling. More like screaming bloody murder.

I ran outside and discovered the noise was coming from the house next door. I bounded in and found my neighbor in her bedroom, alternately curled on her bed, then sitting up screaming. Her dogs were cowering.


If you want to be at the center of a Venn diagram where Cannabis Enthusiast overlaps with History Buff, then download the new podcast "Great Moments in Weed History with Abdullah and Bean," which aims to turn your next couch-surfing session into a time-traveling, THC-trivia-packed adventure by focusing on the relationship between pot and cannabis-culture heroes such as Willie Nelson, Maya Angelou, Carl Sagan and Jesus. (Yes, that Jesus.)

The podcast was created by veteran cannabis journalists David Bienenstock, a former head of content for High Times and author of "How to Smoke Pot (Properly): A Highbrow Guide to Getting High," and Abdullah Saeed, former host of the "Bong Appétit" TV series and a recurring guest star on HBO's "High Maintenance." The co-hosts bring a combined quarter-century of cannabis coverage experience to the table.

Paris-based trendy-casual brand Sandro, which has a long history of mining the music world for its capsule collections — think David Bowie, the Stone Roses, Nirvana, Sonic Youth, New Order and Joy Division — has licensed the name and likeness of reggae legend Bob Marley for a quartet of spring and summer 2018 men's pieces. This new collection, which dropped Wednesday, is just in time for music festival season.

Pieces include a green, yellow and red-striped cotton T-shirt with Marley's name in black flocking above the late musician's likeness ($100); a black T-shirt with his name in white flocking above a similar illustration ($100); and a white linen tee ($130) screen-printed with "Exodus — Bob Marley & the Wailers" — a reference to the group's 1977 album (and, as Marley fans will no doubt notice immediately, it's in the same typeface as the words appear on the album's cover).

Alarmed that California's fledgling legal marijuana industry is being undercut by the black market, a group of lawmakers proposed Thursday to reduce state taxes for three years on growing and selling cannabis to allow licensed sellers to get on their feet.

With many California license holders claiming they can't compete because of high state and local taxes, the new legislation would cut the state excise tax from 15% to 11% and suspend a cultivation tax that charges $148 per pound.


Federal prosecutors in San Diego announced Thursday they have indicted 75 people nationwide, including 40 in San Diego, in a massive drugs and money operation that interim U.S. Attorney Adam Braverman called the biggest money laundering investigation ever in San Diego.

The defendants laundered drug proceeds from the Sinaloa cartel for years, Braverman said at a news conference at the federal building in downtown San Diego announcing the wide-ranging operation. He said the network was responsible for laundering tens of millions of dollars in drug profits in the past three years.

The Costa Mesa Planning Commission gave the green light to another medical marijuana manufacturing and distribution facility Monday night.

Commissioners voted unanimously to grant a conditional use permit for Nature's Market, which plans to open in an existing 24,379-square-foot industrial building at 1675 Toronto Way.

California's pot czar has begun warning marijuana sellers that they can no longer operate without state licenses.
California's pot czar has begun warning marijuana sellers that they can no longer operate without state licenses. (Mathew Sumner / Associated Press)

California’s pot regulation agency has sent 900 warning letters to marijuana shops suspected of operating without state licenses.

Lori Ajax, the chief of the state Bureau of Cannabis Control, also sent a cease-and-desist notice to the marijuana-location service Weedmaps, telling it to stop advertising sellers that lack a permit, officials said Wednesday.

Ajax, the first person to hold her post, notified Weedmaps that a new state law that took effect Jan. 1 requires all marijuana sellers to have state licenses and all advertisements to contain the state license number.


A weathered marquee near the center of this small Native American reservation perched on the high desert plateaus of central Oregon reads "Every Day Is Another Chance," offering a sense of optimism that can be hard to find among anybody who lives here.

The once-bustling lumber mill that sliced and shipped Douglas fir throughout the Pacific Northwest closed two years ago when the machines got too old and expensive to replace. The tribe tried a casino, but it was located half an hour from the highway, and nobody came.

A sign on Highway 49 in San Andreas voices opposition to a ban on growing marijuana in Calaveras County.
A sign on Highway 49 in San Andreas voices opposition to a ban on growing marijuana in Calaveras County. (Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

Dennis Mills peered over his shoulder at the green hills below, where marijuana farms dotted the Calaveras County landscape.

“There’s another one!” he told the pilot with a laugh. The Cessna doubled back so Mills, a county supervisor, could steal a second look at a slope where trees had recently been removed.

From above, Mills said, it’s impossible to tell which cannabis cultivation sites are legal. But it didn’t matter to him. Every single one has to go.

Check your bags, dump the weed.

McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas is now offering travelers a chance to dispose of any marijuana they might have on them before hopping onto a flight. So-called "amnesty boxes" have been installed at the airport and soon will be located at smaller airports in North Las Vegas and Henderson — 20 dope boxes in all.