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Philip Roth

A collection of news and information related to Philip Roth published by this site and its partners.

Top Philip Roth Articles

Displaying items 34-44
  • Five summers, memorable for the reading

    1974: Unhappy at summer camp, I holed up in my bunk and read Philip Roth's "Portnoy's Complaint" and Bernard Malamud's "The Natural." The camp might have been awful, but the books were anything but. 1980: In June, I attended a writers conference at UC...
  • What's on these authors' summer 2011 reading list

    What's on these authors' summer 2011 reading list
    Here at Book Review, we know what looked good to us on the summer bookshelves, but we couldn't help but wonder what some of our favorite authors were looking forward to tossing in their travel bag or bringing out to the backyard or the beach for one of...
  • The what-might-have-been genre

    Mysteries and thrillers hinge on basic questions: whodunit, whydunit and the dreaded had-I-but-known. Then there's what-might-have-been, which is the domain of thrillers that recount alternate histories. Instead of fashioning chaos out of order in a world...
  • Two timeless, Depression-era novels from Edward Anderson

    Two timeless, Depression-era novels from Edward Anderson
    Edward Anderson had a strange and sad career. He was born in Texas in 1905 and grew up in Oklahoma, serving his apprenticeship as a journalist on a small paper in Ardmore, Okla. Restless, he worked as a deckhand on a freighter, plied his fists as a...
  • When the college admission essay becomes a family affair

    With tickets just impossible to get, I propose to the family that we hold our own inaugural ball. "You mean a dance?" Posh says. "I never said that." "What about dinner?" she asks. "Tonight?" I say. "I mean at the ball," she says. "We're having a...
  • No thanks, James

    No thanks, James
    By Richard Rayner "Ulysses" (Vintage: $17 paper) is the description of a single day, June 16, 1904, a day in the mingled lives of characters walking, talking, dreaming, eating, drinking, mourning and climaxing their way through the hours of an average...
  • His own brand

    His own brand
    Almost 50 years ago, in 1959, Philip Roth published "Goodbye, Columbus," a coming-of-age love story that was short, sharp, tender and pitch-perfect, and won the National Book Award. Few writers have launched a career so auspiciously. Roth, of course, went...
  • Jacket Copy

    Shiver me timbers R.L. Stine, author of the beloved "Goosebumps" series of creepy, crawly stories, is heading to "HorrorLand." The ghoulish theme park will be the springboard for 12 new tales, with Scholastic Books planning to release the first two...
  • School is all booked up

    School is a unifying experience, one that almost everybody shares. Perhaps that's why so much has been written about it, including the children's books of Barbara Park and the novels of James Hilton and John Knowles. Still, of all the levels of education,...
  • John Updike dies at 76; Pulitzer-winning author

    John Updike dies at 76; Pulitzer-winning author
    John Updike, the two-time Pulitzer Prize winner for fiction whose novels and short stories exposed an undercurrent of ambivalence and disappointment in small-town, middle-class America, died Tuesday. He was 76. Updike's death from lung cancer was...
  • "Terrorist: A Novel" by John Updike

    THOUGH he has published six books since 2000, John Updike, it seems, really wants our attention. "Terrorist." You knew, sooner or later, he was going to get around to this -- shocks to the American system are an Updike specialty (see, among others,...