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Fight over fighting's role in evolution enters round two
Fight over fighting's role in evolution enters round two

Did evolution hand man a face that’s fit to take a punch? David R. Carrier, a University of Utah biologist who specializes in comparative biomechanics, believes that shortly after human-like primates stopped swinging from trees, they swung at each other. Our jaws, molars, cheeks, brows and other parts of the skull became more robust as a result of perennial fisticuffs, according to a study published this week in the journal Biological Reviews. The theory already is sparking the same academic boxing match as did Carrier’s first parry, two years ago, when he and University of Utah physician Michael H. Morgan suggested the modern hand was more likely adapted for aggression than...

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