Rodrigo Santoro

The film academy's diversity push means neglected films have their shot at the canon

The film academy's diversity push means neglected films have their shot at the canon

The first time I saw myself — black, queer and fabulous — fully reflected on the big screen was in 2008 with the release of Patrik-Ian Polk’s “Noah’s Arc: Jumping the Broom.” I was 16 years old.

In the 10 years since, I’ve discovered Polk’s “Punks” and “The Skinny,” Dee Rees’ “Pariah,” Tina Mabry’s “Mississippi Damned,” Cheryl Dunye’s “The Watermelon Woman” and documentaries like Jennie Livingston’s “Paris Is Burning” and Marlon Riggs’ “Tongues Untied” and “Black Is ... Black Ain't.”

I’ve often wondered why these pictures weren’t on the tongues of everyone who considered themselves cinephiles. I had seen “Singin’ in the Rain” and “The Wizard of Oz” and “Gone With the Wind” and...

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