RSS feeds allow Web site content to be gathered via feed reader software. Click the subscribe link to obtain the feed URL for this page. The feed will update when new content appears on this page.

Acetaminophen (drug) (INACTIVE)

A collection of news and information related to Acetaminophen (drug) (INACTIVE) published by this site and its partners.

Top Acetaminophen (drug) (INACTIVE) Articles see all

Displaying items 1-5
  • Acetaminophen in pregnancy linked to ADHD in kids, study finds

    Acetaminophen in pregnancy linked to ADHD in kids, study finds
    Pregnant women have long been assured that acetaminophen can treat their aches, pains and fevers without bringing harm to the babies they carry. Now researchers say they have found a strong link between prenatal use of the medication and cases of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in children.
  • Tylenol use during pregnancy linked to ADHD in kids, study finds

    Tylenol use during pregnancy linked to ADHD in kids, study finds
    Facing a world full of potential dangers for the babies they carry, pregnant women hear regularly that acetaminophen can be trusted to reduce fevers and relieve aches and pains without causing harm to a developing fetus. But a new study reports that the...

    Irish company to buy Cadence Pharmaceuticals of San Diego

    An Irish pharmaceutical company agreed to acquire Cadence Pharmaceuticals Inc. in San Diego for about $1.3 billion in an effort to boost its specialty drugs portfolio. Dublin-based Mallinckrodt agreed to pay $14 a share for the company, a 26% premium...

    Mallinckrodt acquires San Diego pharma firm Cadence for $1.3 billion

    Mallinckrodt acquires San Diego pharma firm Cadence for $1.3 billion
    Ireland pharmaceutical company Mallinckrodt has agreed to acquire San Diego company Cadence Pharmaceuticals for about $1.3 billion in an effort to boost its specialty drugs portfolio. Cadence, which commercializes drugs that are used in hospitals, is...

    Got flu? Keep it to yourself.

     Got flu? Keep it to yourself.
    Doctors used to call influenza "knock-me-down" fever, and there was a reason for that. Anyone who's suffered through a bout of it knows the miseries: the headaches, the throat that feels scrubbed with sandpaper, the fever so high you're floating on the...