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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
On Hawaii Island, watching a disaster flow ever closer
On Hawaii Island, watching a disaster flow ever closer

It is 100 yards wide, nine miles long and traveling between 125 yards and 300 yards a day, a slow-moving ribbon of lava that has kept residents of the rural Puna district of Hawaii Island braced for the inevitable as the ongoing eruption of Kilauea volcano 10 miles away approaches. If it stays on its current path, the lava would go through downtown Pahoa and cross Highway 130 — the only road linking the 9,000 residents of lower Puna with the rest of the island. About 7,000 vehicles travel the two-lane highway daily, and road crews have been feverishly working to finish alternate escape routes. The flow began June 27 and traveled through an uninhabited rain forest, skirting the...

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