"The West Wing" began its campaign to dominate the nighttime Emmy Awards for the second straight year by receiving four awards -- more than any other program -- during ceremonies on Sept. 8 primarily devoted to honoring television shows in technical areas.

NBC's White House drama collected Emmys for editing, cinematography, casting and sound mixing in the Emmys' creative arts portion, which encompasses more than 50 categories.

Most of the higher-profile awards for actors and programs will be handed out Sunday and televised on CBS.

"West Wing" won a total of nine Emmys last year, the most for any series in a single season. HBO's "The Sopranos," which tied the NBC show with 18 nominations overall, shot down just one award on Sept. 8, for makeup.

CBS' "Survivor" was anointed best nonfiction program (special class), a new category introduced specifically to recognize the new breed of so-called "reality" shows that incorporate a game or stunt element.

Despite televising this year's awards, CBS has bristled at the fact that the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences -- which presents the Emmys -- chose to relegate that award to the creative arts ceremony, given that "Survivor" was TV's most-watched program last season.

"The academy has spoken," quipped producer Mark Burnett in accepting the award at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium.

"Survivor" garnered a second Emmy for sound mixing of nonfiction programming, and the canceled Fox series "American High" -- which documented lives of high school students -- won in the other new category of nonfiction program (reality).

Fox's "The Simpsons" was again named outstanding animated program. PBS' "American Masters: Finding Lucy" edged out a field that included the splashier Ken Burns documentary "Jazz" for best nonfiction informational series.

Guest-acting categories were also recognized, with Derek Jacobi and Jean Smart both winning for "Frasier" on the comedy series front, while dramatic awards went to Oscar winner Sally Field for "ER" and Michael Emerson, who played serial killer William Hinks on ABC's "The Practice."

Buoyed by "West Wing" and "Frasier," which took home a third award for editing, NBC received 11 Emmys total. That tied Fox, whose tally included three technical awards for the special "Barbra Streisand: Timeless," as the most-honored network.

HBO, with a pair of awards each for its Bruce Springsteen concert special and the movie "61*," garnered eight Emmys, while ABC claimed seven, with a trio going to its miniseries "Life With Judy Garland: Me and My Shadows."

CBS, PBS and UPN each amassed five awards, with "Star Trek: Voyager" receiving two in its final season.

Ironically, a spot for noncommercial broadcaster PBS, titled "Photo Booth," claimed the still relatively new Emmy prize for best commercial.