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Sandy Hook 911 debate pits privacy against public's right to know
Sandy Hook 911 debate pits privacy against public's right to know

The same day the FBI released video showing Aaron Alexis hunting down people in the halls of the Washington Navy Yard, Connecticut law enforcement officials were defending their refusal to make public 911 recordings from December’s Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre. The Connecticut officials lost; the state’s Freedom of Information Commission on Wednesday ordered the state’s attorney in Danbury, Stephen Sedensky III, to release the recordings. But Sedensky plans to appeal, promising to extend a legal battle that has raised the question of when the public’s right to know supersedes the need for sensitivity toward victims’ families -- especially when...

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