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Shabab gunmen's siege at Somali hotel ends with 17 dead

Al Qaeda-linked Islamic extremist group claims responsibility for assault on Somalia hotel

Somali troops on Saturday took full control of a hotel that extremist gunmen stormed and occupied for more than 12 hours following a suicide bombing. At least 17 people died and dozens were wounded.

The gunfire has stopped and security agents have accessed the whole building, said senior police officer Capt. Mohamed Hussein. He had earlier said the gunmen were believed to have occupied the third and fourth floors of the the Maka Mukarramah hotel in the capital Mogadishu.

“The operation has ended we have taken full control of the hotel,” Hussein said.

Hussein said security forces found four more bodies in the hotel Saturday, plus nine dead on Friday. Four people died in the hospital, according to Duniya Mohamed, a doctor at Madina hospital in Mogadishu. Hussein Ali, an official of Mogadishu's ambulance service, said there were 28 wounded.

There was no immediate indication of how many of the dead were attackers, all of whom were killed according to Hussein.

Somalia's ambassador to Switzerland was among those killed in the attack, said Somali President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud.

Shabab, an Al Qaeda-linked Islamic extremist group that has carried out many attacks in Somalia, claimed responsibility for the assault on the hotel, which is popular with Somali government officials and foreigners.

Shabab controlled much of Mogadishu between 2007 and 2011, but was pushed out of Somalia's capital and other major cities by African Union forces.

The attack started around 4 p.m. Friday when a suicide bomber detonated his explosives-laden car at the gate of the hotel. Gunmen then quickly moved in.

Hours later, the militants were still holed up in the hotel's dark alleys and rooms. Sporadic gunfire could be heard, but it appeared that the security forces waited until daybreak before trying again to dislodge the militants.

Shabab routinely carries out suicide bombings, drive-by shootings and other attacks in Mogadishu, the seat of Somalia's Western-backed government — often targeting government troops, lawmakers and foreigners.

Despite major setbacks in 2014, Shabab continues to wage a deadly insurgency against Somalia's government and remains a threat in the East African region.

The group has carried out attacks in neighboring countries, including Kenya, whose military is part of the African Union troops bolstering Somalia's weak government against Shabab insurgency.

At least 67 people were killed in a September 2013 attack by Shabab on a mall in the Kenyan capital of Nairobi

Copyright © 2016, Los Angeles Times

UPDATE

1:17 a.m.: This article was updated with new details throughout.

This article was first posted at 12:32 a.m.

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