Without a Country

A Times Series

  • Love across the border

    Love across the border

    Ana and Gerardo's devotion swayed many who doubted that a marriage with a 41-year age gap was real. But one skeptic could be trouble -- the official deciding whether to give Ana a U.S. visa. Read more: Trying to prove their love

  • Love beyond borders

    Love beyond borders

    The young UC Berkeley graduate married a Glendale bus driver. They were more than 40 years apart in age. When they applied to legalize her immigration status, "It didn't turn out so well." Now they're 1,500 miles apart — but still in love.

More from Without a Country

  • A risky return to the U.S.

    A risky return to the U.S. for a young deportee

    After more than a year in Mexico, a 21-year-old deportee makes another perilous border crossing. It is desperation that drives him to risk his life repeatedly, he says.

  • A father's long battle for his daughters

    A father's long battle for his daughters

    Luis Ernesto Rodriguez eyed the metal door as he waited for his little girls. Now 6 and 5 years old, they were his only children, inseparable, with thick black hair and mischievous smiles that reminded people of little mermaids. More than two years had passed since he had last seen them. What would...

  • Caught in the current of reverse migration

    Caught in the current of reverse migration

    Thousands of U.S.-born children now live throughout Mexico as a result of deportation of a family member. Disoriented, they struggle in a society that views them with a mix of envy and pity.

  • Trying to get back to the only life he knew

    Trying to get back to the only life he knew

    Luis Luna, 20, was smuggled to the U.S. from Mexico when he was 3. He grew up, went to school, found jobs. Then the Washington state resident was deported after a cop pulled him over for a broken headlight. He hopes to return on the undercarriage of a boxcar.

  • In Mexicali, a haven for broken lives

    In Mexicali, a haven for broken lives

    The once-grand El Hotel Centenario is now the decrepit El Hotel del Migrante Deportado — the Hotel of the Deported Migrant. It hosts a procession of lost souls.

  • Deportees to Mexico's Tamaulipas preyed upon by gangs

    Deportees to Mexico's Tamaulipas preyed upon by gangs

    Not even a church-run shelter is safe for migrants sent back to a dangerous region of Mexico by the United States. Viewed as rich targets, the deportees are vulnerable to kidnapping — and worse.

Immigration News

  • New wave of Cuban immigrants reaches U.S., but through Texas, not Florida

    New wave of Cuban immigrants reaches U.S., but through Texas, not Florida

    When Jordanis Perez fled Havana this spring for the United States, he decided his best chances weren't by boat to Florida, but by a route increasingly favored by thousands of Cuban migrants— by land to Texas. The number of Cubans arriving at the southern border increased this year after President...

  • Why fewer Mexicans are leaving their homeland for the U.S.

    Why fewer Mexicans are leaving their homeland for the U.S.

    To its southern neighbor, the United States once represented hope, safety and prosperity. But with the effects of the Great Recession still lingering and tougher enforcement along the U.S. border, fewer Mexicans see a reason to leave their homeland.“There isn't much work because the economy there...

  • Border agents won't face charges in Taser-related death of Mexican man

    Border agents won't face charges in Taser-related death of Mexican man

    Federal prosecutors will not bring charges in the case of a Mexican man who died of a heart attack after he was hit and struck with a Taser by U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents at a border checkpoint in California five years ago, the Justice Department said Friday after closing the investigation....

  • Should Border Patrol require body cameras? Internal review says no

    Should Border Patrol require body cameras? Internal review says no

    An internal review by U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials found that staff at the nation's largest law enforcement agency shouldn't be required to wear body cameras in the field, despite the growing popularity of the devices among police and advocates.   According to a copy reviewed by...

  • Immigrant family detention centers are prison-like, critics say, despite order to improve

    Immigrant family detention centers are prison-like, critics say, despite order to improve

    On deadline to improve immigrant family detention centers, Obama administration officials said they had converted the facilities into short-term processing sites, holding more families in recent months but for less time. Immigrant advocates, however, say that conditions at the centers remain prison-like,...

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