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Mubarak trial resumes in Egypt, with small interruption

Courts and the JudiciaryEgyptian Protests (2012-2013)Petroleum IndustryEgyptMohamed MorsiMuslim BrotherhoodHosni Mubarak

CAIRO -- The retrial of former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak resumed Saturday, but was briefly interrupted when the toppled leader reported feeling low blood pressure and medics were called in to assist.

Mubarak, along with his two sons, former interior minister Habib El Adly and six security officers stand accused in the death of protesters during January 2011 demonstrations.

The court hearing, which journalists and television cameras were barred from attending by a court order citing “national security,” was the second of four sessions where Judge Mahmoud El Rashidi is listening to testimony.

The defendants sat in a glass cage, similar to that installed during recent hearings for ousted President Mohamed Morsi, who had succeeded Mubarak, and leaders of Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood group. The defendants are charged with killing protesters in 2012 demonstrations.

Former head of the military police Hamdi Badeen and telecommunications authority executive Amr Badawi provided testimony on Saturday. According to the state news agency MENA, Badeen was asked 256 questions during six hours on the stand. The previous session last month featured testimony from journalist Ibrahim Eissa, known for his strong opposition of Mubarak’s government.

Mubarak, 85, is residing in a military hospital under care for health problems he has complained of since he was forced from office in early 2011.

Mubarak and his sons Gamal and Alaa are also facing embezzlement charges for exporting Egyptian natural gas to Israel at prices far below the going global rate

Police officials are due to provide testimony during hearings scheduled for Sunday and Monday.

In June 2012, both Mubarak and Adly were sentenced to life in prison on the same charges, but an appellate court later ordered a retrial.

Hassan is a special correspondent.

 

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
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Courts and the JudiciaryEgyptian Protests (2012-2013)Petroleum IndustryEgyptMohamed MorsiMuslim BrotherhoodHosni Mubarak
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