Only on PIX 11: Never Before Seen Footage of Walter Cronkite

EntertainmentTelevisionWalter CronkiteJournalismKatie CouricBarack Obama

He reported the news, but his resonant, reassuring voice filtered through the hearts and minds of people everywhere. Walter Cronkite, who covered the second World War for the wire services and later became the iconic anchorman of the 'CBS Evening News,' set the standard by which all others have been judged.

When the news broke, anytime, anywhere, Walter was there and so were millions of Americans who put their trust in him.

"He was an authentic journalist who respected his audience and they respected him," said former CBS anchor, Roger Mudd.

Katie Couric, the current anchor of the 'CBS Evening News' said Cronkite set the standards for journalists everywhere.

"He was the personification of integrity, decency, humanity," said Couric.

Walter Cronkite - Uncle Walter as he came to be known - was the embodiment of authority as he never lost his fascination for news. In particular, he had an adolescent enthusiasm about space.

Cronkite never viewed himself as a performer - just a reporter to whom people could relate.

"Walter was more than just an anchor, but someone we could trust to guide us through the issues of the day," said President Barack Obama. "He was family. In moments of tragedy, Walter looked us in the eye and shared our pain:"

Cronkite prided himself as a fair reporter, but there were moments when he took sides and helped shape the times. It was his assessment of the Vietnam war that became a turning point. That view by the man considered the most trusted in America, led President Johnson to observe "If I've lost Cronkite, I've lost middle America."

After nearly 20 years of guiding us through the triumphs and tragedies of our time, Walter Cronkite left the anchor chair in 1981.

"He was literally a living legend," said former CBS anchor Dan Rather. "Now a legend in memory."

Any news person would consider themselves extremely fortunate to have crossed paths professionally with the famed anchor. PIX News reporter Marvin Scott actually had the honor of working alongside Cronkite on a pilot for a television show back in 1994.

"It was a thrill to work with the man I had looked up to as a role model for many years," said Scott.

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
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