Finally, First Responders Get Memorial Of Their Own

Human InterestHealthDiseases and IllnessesSeptember 11, 2001 AttacksWPIXLong IslandNew York City Police Department

More than 300 people turned out Saturday for the dedication of the 9/11 Responders Remembered Memorial Park in Nesconset, Long Island.

The ceremony featured the unveiling of a 60-foot black granite wall . The names of about a thousand first responders who have died from illnesses linked to work at Ground Zero will be etched in the granite.

It is the first memorial to honor first responders.

"Our responders who have sacrificed, who have suffered, who have committed their lives with dignity and left legacies of honor, will not be forgotten by the United States of America," said the Rev. Bill Minson, who blessed the park.

Eileen Ryan, whose husband Michael, an NYPD sergeant, lost his battle with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in 2007, welcomes the convenience of the memorial. "Even though their names are on the wall in the police department and down in Battery Park, here it's close to home, " Eileen Ryan said.

"Trees will be added, landscaping will be added and so will names. Throughout the years and history of this park, we will keep adding names," said John Feal, founder of the FealGood Foundation which advocates for sick and dying responders.

A proud companion piece to the wall, is the park's 16-foot high clock which glows in the dark. It was donated by WPIX-TV through the fund-raising arm of the station. "To give us the $27,500 to build this clock was a great donation," said Jim Ryder, a retired police officer and park board member. "It's a landmark of sorts, and as people drive by, the first thing they are going to see is that handsome clock."

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
Related Content
Human InterestHealthDiseases and IllnessesSeptember 11, 2001 AttacksWPIXLong IslandNew York City Police Department
Comments
Loading