Screen shot from Converge's 'All We Love We Leave Behind' Album Stream by Jacob Bannon.

<p style="font-size:14px;margin-bottom:12px;">Q: That intelligence that your music has, I believe that's what appeals to listeners who are not just fans of heavy music or hardcore music. I think there's a select group of really heavy bands that are creating very intelligent music that's intricately constructed. I try to think of why certain things appeal to other listeners, and I think you nailed it with that comment.
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A: It's usually a generality that rings true, in a way, that a lot of heavy music is a no-brainer. It's there to provoke a specific kind of reaction. But there are bands like ourselves and others that are searching for a little more. There's more substance. There's more meat there. I find it to be interesting now, especially in this wild melting pot of music that we exist in, that you have indie artists and bands that are equated with what would be considered alternative music paying as much attention to their simple song structures to the point where they become almost pop music. So you start getting these things that are -- they may be within the independent world or aggressive world or heavy world, however you want to define it, but they are essentially pop records, or they are essentially pop songs. They are emotionally fairly simple. They aren't really complex. I have satellite radio, so if I put on a random station there, sometimes I can't tell the difference between something that is on the college radio-based station and something that would appear on a top forty sort of station. I don't know if that's a good or bad thing. Or maybe people are just getting more simple. But that just means that there's more of a space for bands like ourselves and others who are trying things that are a little bit different, a little bit more soulful, a little more human. That's another thing too: a lot of heavy music gets wrapped up in character. It gets wrapped up in decoration and fantasy. In the hardcore world, we're really free of that. We are just four relatively normal-looking guys with relatively average backgrounds on a quest to make some music that moves us. So I think that people can relate to that as well, especially when they are getting a little older and they don't necessarily want to dress like a glam-metal guy or like a pop-punk kid or something like that. They just want to be themselves. I guess a band like ourselves can appeal to different people if those people are just evolving.</p>

( youtube.com / October 9, 2012 )

Q: That intelligence that your music has, I believe that's what appeals to listeners who are not just fans of heavy music or hardcore music. I think there's a select group of really heavy bands that are creating very intelligent music that's intricately constructed. I try to think of why certain things appeal to other listeners, and I think you nailed it with that comment.

A: It's usually a generality that rings true, in a way, that a lot of heavy music is a no-brainer. It's there to provoke a specific kind of reaction. But there are bands like ourselves and others that are searching for a little more. There's more substance. There's more meat there. I find it to be interesting now, especially in this wild melting pot of music that we exist in, that you have indie artists and bands that are equated with what would be considered alternative music paying as much attention to their simple song structures to the point where they become almost pop music. So you start getting these things that are -- they may be within the independent world or aggressive world or heavy world, however you want to define it, but they are essentially pop records, or they are essentially pop songs. They are emotionally fairly simple. They aren't really complex. I have satellite radio, so if I put on a random station there, sometimes I can't tell the difference between something that is on the college radio-based station and something that would appear on a top forty sort of station. I don't know if that's a good or bad thing. Or maybe people are just getting more simple. But that just means that there's more of a space for bands like ourselves and others who are trying things that are a little bit different, a little bit more soulful, a little more human. That's another thing too: a lot of heavy music gets wrapped up in character. It gets wrapped up in decoration and fantasy. In the hardcore world, we're really free of that. We are just four relatively normal-looking guys with relatively average backgrounds on a quest to make some music that moves us. So I think that people can relate to that as well, especially when they are getting a little older and they don't necessarily want to dress like a glam-metal guy or like a pop-punk kid or something like that. They just want to be themselves. I guess a band like ourselves can appeal to different people if those people are just evolving.

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