Law, Caine Team Up for 'Sleuth' Remake

Crime, Law and JusticeCelebritiesHarold PinterEntertainmentMoviesJude LawDeath

Jude Law, who starred in the "Alfie" remake, will take on another of Michael Caine's previous film roles, this time teamed with Caine himself.

The British actors have signed on to star in Kenneth Branagh's remake of the 1970s thriller "Sleuth."

The update revolves around Andrew Wyke (Caine), a wealthy writer who specializes in detective stories. When he discovers that his wife is having an affair with Milo Tindle (Law), an out-of-work actor, he dreams up a cunning scheme that pits one creative mind against the other.

Nobel Laureate playwright Harold Pinter adapted Anthony's Shaffer's Tony-winning play about sexual conflict, jealousy, power and manipulation for this latest turn on the big screen. The 1972 version directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz starred Caine in the Milo role opposite Laurence Olivier as the cuckholded husband.

"Jude Law and Harold Pinter had developed this exceptional screenplay when I joined them, " says director Branagh. "Harold Pinter's freedom with the material made it a new film, not a remake, and the enthusiasm of these two great actors was very exciting."

Besides starring in the film, Law will be a producer under his Riff Raff Productions banner. Sony Pictures Classics made a pact with Riff Raff, Castle Rock, and MRC to distribute the film in North America and Latin America.

Production will begin this month at London's Twickenham Studios.

Caine's most recent projects include "Bewitched," "The Weather Man," "The Prestige" and Alfonso Cuaron's "Children of Men," currently in theaters. Law was recently in "All the King's Men," "Breaking and Entering" and the holiday romantic comedy "The Holiday."

Branagh is an actor-director who often specializes in bringing Shakespeare to the screen. His directing credings include "Henry V," "Dead Again," "Much Ado About Nothing," "Hamlet," "Frankenstein," "A Midwinter's Tale," "Love's Labour Lost" and the upcoming "The Magic Flute" and "As You Like It."

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