The surreal scenes of 40 million Californians staying at home

LA Live has temporarily shut down
LA Live, the popular tourist, dining and entertainment venue, are only doing take outs.
(Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)
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Gov. Gavin Newsom has ordered Californians to stay at home, the first mandatory restrictions placed on all 40 million of the state’s residents in the fight against the novel coronavirus.

With businesses and popular destinations throughout the Southland closed, Los Angeles Times visual journalist Luis Sinco documented the surreal scenes.

Take a look.

Santa Monica Beach
A handful of visitors walk on a largely deserted Santa Monica Beach.
(Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

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Urban Light sculpture at the Los Angeles County of Museum of Art
Visitors pose for pictures at the Urban Light sculpture at the Los Angeles County of Museum of Art in Mid-Wilshire.
(Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)
Santa Monica Pier
The lights are on but the Santa Monica Pier is closed to the public.
(Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)
Shuttered shops line Windward Avenue in Venice Beach
Shuttered shops line Windward Avenue in Venice.
(Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)
The streets of Santa Monica are largely empty
The streets of Santa Monica are largely empty.
(Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)
 A lone vendor sits along the empty boardwalk at Venice Beach
A lone vendor sits along the empty boardwalk at Venice Beach.
(Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)
Metro Hollywood/Highland station
A lone commuter waits on the platform of the Metro Hollywood/Highland Station in Hollywood.
(Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

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Walt Disney Concert Hall
Walt Disney Concert Hall in downtown L.A. is also shut down.
(Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)
Sunset Strip in West Hollywood
The famed Sunset Strip in West Hollywood is largely devoid of motor and pedestrian traffic.
(Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

On Thursday evening, Gov. Gavin Newsom issued a statewide “stay at home” order. Los Angeles Times photographer Jay L. Clendenin and videographer Mark Potts document the first night of the order in Hollywood.