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Jimmy Kimmel is just a concerned consumer who wants to know that the goods he purchases are made in America. And that may end up costing the Trumps.   

On Wednesday night’s episode of “Jimmy Kimmel Live,” the host revealed that he went on a little shopping spree at the Trump Organization’s official online store to see where all the Trump-branded merchandise is actually made. 

“Trump, as you know, wants to focus on America. American-made products and goods,” explained Kimmel. “So I wondered — because I agree with that — how things were going on his family website, trumpstore.com.”

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(Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

Comedian Wanda Sykes will host the 29th GLAAD Media Awards in Los Angeles next month.

The “black-ish” actress was the 2010 recipient of GLAAD’s Stephen F. Kolzak Award for an LGBTQ media professional who has made a significant difference in promoting acceptance. 

“Wanda Sykes’ humor, wit, and status as one of the most visible out women in Hollywood make her the perfect host for the 29th annual GLAAD Media Awards in Los Angeles,” said GLAAD President and CEO Sarah Kate Ellis in a statement on Wednesday. “At a time when LGBTQ acceptance and equality are eroding, it’s more important than ever that we celebrate the best in LGBTQ representation, and share a few laughs along the way.”

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Katy Perry's most recent news cycle included a dead nun and yet, somehow, that wasn’t the low point of her week.

Perry courted controversy when, during Sunday’s premiere of ABC’s “American Idol” reboot, she laid a kiss on a 19-year-old contestant who said he had never been kissed before.

The awkward moment soon spiraled into a story, with some individuals questioning Perry’s action in light of the #MeToo movement.

  • Birthdays
(Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times)

Why is it so hard for some people to reconcile beauty or sexiness with smart? There's so many women in the world who are complex, complicated people. I'm not saying I'm one of them, I'm just saying people tend to view through one lens.

Brandy performs on "Total Request Live" in 2000.
Brandy performs on "Total Request Live" in 2000. (Jim Cooper)

Rumors that MTV would be cancel “Total Request Live,” the rebooted afternoon show that gained popularity in the early 2000s, circulated Wednesday morning after staff members received a memo saying that the show would not return.

According to TMZ, employees were sent an email notifying them the show would not be returning in April after its February hiatus as planned. The email said that the show would “pivot to short form content that will be featured on social and digital platforms.”

But MTV later told the Times The show would continue. 

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Harper Lee in 2007.
Harper Lee in 2007. (Rob Carr / Associated Press)

The estate of “To Kill a Mockingbird” author Harper Lee is suing the production company behind screenwriter Aaron Sorkin’s much-anticipated Broadway adaptation of the classic story, saying the show as scripted deviates too much from the original work. 

In June 2015, producer Scott Rudin’s theater production company, Rudinplay, optioned Lee’s book for the stage. As part of that contract it was agreed that the play’s script would remain faithful to the spirit of the book and wouldn’t alter the characters, according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday by attorney Tonja B. Carter in U.S. District Court in Alabama.

Carter became executor of Lee’s estate after the writer died in February 2016. The estate first became concerned, the suit says, after reading a Sorkin interview Vulture published last September. 

Let it go and let it snow in Boston, people, because amazing things can happen — witness an adult man dressed as Queen Elsa from “Frozen” coming to the chilly rescue of a Boston police vehicle in front of a gastropub audience. 

“Yup, that just happened. Drag ‘Elsa’ just single-handedly pushed out a stuck police wagon,” publicist Christopher B. Haynes wrote Tuesday night as he posted video on social media. “Only in the #southend and @thegallowsboston.”

Attorney Jason Triplett, who bought the costume last winter, wore it to the Gallows pub that night simply to give his friends a laugh, the 37-year-old told the Boston Globe

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Director Jim Cummings, right, and the cast and crew of "Thunder Road" accept the SXSW Narrative Feature Award.
Director Jim Cummings, right, and the cast and crew of "Thunder Road" accept the SXSW Narrative Feature Award. (Michael Loccisano / Getty Images for SXSW)

The South by Southwest Film Festival announced its jury and special award winners Tuesday night at the Paramount Theatre in Austin, Texas. The festival continues into the weekend, with the North American premiere of Wes Anderson’s “Isle of Dogs” closing out the event Saturday night.

The grand jury winner for the narrative feature competition was “Thunder Road,” directed, written by and starring Jim Cummings. Based on Cummings’ 2016 award-winning short film, the feature is about a police officer struggling to hold together his personal and professional lives.

A special jury recognition prize for first feature was given to Carly Stone for the romantic comedy “The New Romantic.” And special jury recognition for writing went to Nijla Mu’min for the coming-of-age drama “Jinn.”

Kendal Farr, left, and Jim Cummings in "Thunder Road."
Kendal Farr, left, and Jim Cummings in "Thunder Road." (The 10 East)
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(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

Write what you feel, write what you know. Be daring and brave. Believe in the power of silence. You don't need to have a laugh every few seconds. If it's real to me, it will be real to [you].

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Finding laughter in the grief

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Writer-creator Peter Morgan, center, with Matt Smith and Claire Foy.
Writer-creator Peter Morgan, center, with Matt Smith and Claire Foy. (Alex Bailey / Netflix)

Heavy is the head that wears the crown, but that doesn’t mean it’s more expensive.

“The Crown” star Claire Foy, who plays a young Queen Elizabeth II in Netflix’s lush series about the modern British monarchy, was paid less than her male costar Matt Smith, according to show producers, who divulged the detail during a panel about the series at the INTV Conference in Jerusalem on Tuesday.

That’s because when filming began, Smith, who plays the queen’s querulous husband, Prince Philip, hailed from the popular “Doctor Who” franchise, producers explained.