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Two Senate Democrats want to know what role Kathy Kraninger, who is President Trump’s choice to lead the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, played in the administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy as a White House aide.

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Nominees for top federal financial regulators usually have worked in high-level government or private-sector jobs and President Trump had been following that traditional playbook. Until his latest pick.

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  • White House
  • Trade
  • Economy
President Trump speaks at the White House on Monday.
President Trump speaks at the White House on Monday. (Alex Wong / Getty Images)

President Trump directed the U.S. trade representative to prepare new tariffs on $200 billion in Chinese imports Monday as the two nations moved closer to a trade war.

The tariffs, which Trump wants set at 10%, would be the latest round of punitive measures in an escalating dispute over the large trade imbalance between the two countries. Trump recently ordered tariffs on $50 billion in Chinese goods in retaliation for what the U.S. said is intellectual property theft. The tariffs were quickly matched by China on U.S. exports.

"China apparently has no intention of changing its unfair practices related to the acquisition of American intellectual property and technology," Trump said in a statement Monday announcing the new action. "Rather than altering those practices, it is now threatening United States companies, workers and farmers who have done nothing wrong."

  • White House
  • Immigration
  • Supreme Court
(Jessica Gresko /Associated Press)

The Supreme Court on Monday effectively punted on the thorny issue of whether partisan gerrymandering of legislative districts is constitutional, dismissing two cases without ruling on the larger issue.  

In a 9-0 decision, the justices said plaintiffs in a Wisconsin lawsuit lacked standing. It also dismissed a similar Maryland case for procedural issues.

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Boys are held at a migrant youth shelter this week in Brownsville, Texas.
Boys are held at a migrant youth shelter this week in Brownsville, Texas. (Health and Human Services)

Migrant family separations on the border have drawn national attention, as the Trump administration enforces a “zero tolerance” policy of charging parents in criminal court and placing their children in federally funded shelters.

A total of 1,995 children have been separated from 1,940 adult guardians who were prosecuted for entering the country illegally from April 19 to May 31, a Department of Homeland Security spokesman said Friday. The spokesman made the comment during a background telephone briefing with reporters. Officials from the Border Patrol and Department of Justice also participated.

A number of lawmakers from both parties, including House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.), have said in recent days that they disagree with the policy of separating children from parents.

Michael Avenatti outside New York federal court.
Michael Avenatti outside New York federal court. (Andres Kudacki / Associated Press)

President Trump’s personal lawyer and fixer Michael Cohen is seeking a gag order to stop Michael Avenatti, the attorney for porn star Stormy Daniels, from maligning him in the news media.

Citing Avenatti’s “seemingly unquenchable thirst for publicity,” Cohen’s lawyer Brent Blakely told a federal judge that Avenatti’s constant bashing of Cohen threatens to deprive Cohen of a fair trial.

In the three months since Daniels sued Cohen and the president to void a contract that bars her from discussing an alleged affair with Trump, Avenatti has talked about the case in at least 121 television appearances and 439 tweets, Blakely said in court papers.

So-called sanctuary jurisdictions that decline to cooperate with federal immigration enforcement could be held liable for failing to detain people in the U.S. illegally for deportation proceedings, under draft legislation proposed Thursday by House Republican leaders.

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An exchange between White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders and CNN's Jim Acosta.

Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions cited the Bible on Thursday in defense of the Trump administration's criminal prosecution of adults who cross the border illegally, effectively separating them from their migrant children. 

“Persons who violate the law of our nation are subject to prosecution. I would cite you to the Apostle Paul and his clear and wise command in Romans 13 to obey the laws of the government because God has ordained them for the purpose of order," he said.

When CNN’s Jim Acosta asked White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders to elaborate on the attorney general’s comments, the conversation turned tense.

Former FBI Director James Comey responded on Twitter to the Justice Department inspector general’s report about his handling of the investigation in 2016 into Hillary Clinton’s emails.

The report found that Comey and others mishandled the case, including by improperly sharing information with the public. Investigators characterized Comey’s disclosure of the FBI’s findings in July 2016 as “extraordinary and insubordinate,” though not politically motivated.

“The conclusions are reasonable, even though I disagree with some,” Comey tweeted Thursday morning. Noting that he had a difficult decision to make, he added, “I pray no Director faces it again.”