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1295 posts
  • K-12
  • University of California
  • LAUSD
Members of the Brown Berets, left, listen to a speaker on June 9, 1968.
Members of the Brown Berets, left, listen to a speaker on June 9, 1968. (Herald-Examiner Collection / Los Angeles Public Library)

In and around Los Angeles:

The school walkouts 50 years ago, now being commemorated, were the first act of mass militancy by Mexican Americans in modern California history.

New York City reportedly selected Miami-Dade schools leader Alberto Carvalho as its new schools chancellor — pulling him out of the pool of potential candidates for L.A. Unified superintendent job.

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Jesse Randall Davidson wasn’t a stranger, some mysterious threat from the outside. He was a bearded, bespectacled, 53-year-old social studies teacher and the play-by-play announcer for the football games at Dalton High School in northwest Georgia.

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David Sanchez, second from left, founder of the Brown Berets, in 1968.
David Sanchez, second from left, founder of the Brown Berets, in 1968. (Los Angeles Times Archive / UCLA)

Teachers at Garfield High School were winding down classes for the approaching lunch break when they heard the startling sound of people — they were not sure who — running through the halls, pounding on classroom doors. “Walkout!” they were shouting. “Walkout!”

They looked on in disbelief as hundreds of students streamed out of classrooms and assembled before the school entrance, their clenched fists held high. “Viva la revolucion!” they called out. “Education, not eradication!” Soon, sheriff’s deputies were rumbling in.

Lauren Hogg, 14, and brother David Hogg, 17, survived the Feb. 14 Parkland shooting.
Lauren Hogg, 14, and brother David Hogg, 17, survived the Feb. 14 Parkland shooting. (Jenny Jarvie / For The Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

  1. L.A. Unified is holding a series of events to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the 1968 walkouts by students demanding educational justice.
  2. Candidates for the LAUSD superintendent job have two weeks to apply.

In California:

  1. Studies that take stock of just how well California’s schools are doing will come out in June, in advance of the state’s November elections.
  2. Five candidates are running for California’s top education spot.

Nationwide:

  1. Two weeks after a deadly school shooting, students returned to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla.
  2. In the wake of the shooting, Dick’s Sporting Goods will immediately stop selling assault-style rifles.

For Isabela Barry, it was time. After two weeks of tears, vigils and funerals — reliving her and her classmates’ ordeal when a gunman rampaged through their school, killing one of her best friends — the 16-year-old was ready to go back to class.

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A former student was arrested early Tuesday after he made threats to “shoot up” a high school in Chino Hills, according to the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department.

The federal response to Florida’s school massacre remained captive to competing political imperatives Tuesday, as House Republicans declined to sign onto President Trump’s proposal to arm and reward teachers willing to carry weapons, even as they made clear their aim is to oppose further restrictions on guns.

  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • University of California
  • LAUSD
LAUSD's SEIU Local 99 workers
LAUSD's SEIU Local 99 workers (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

  1. A union representing L.A. Unified’s non-teaching employees announced Monday that members would vote on whether to strike.

In California:

  1. Sure, more California students are graduating from high school — but college completion rates aren’t keeping up, a new study finds.
  2. Some of California’s struggling college students can get micro grants to help keep them keep going.

Nationwide:

  1. Conservative lawmakers in Arizona take direct steps to try to counterbalance what they see as too much liberalism on college campuses. 
  2. Schools stay closed in West Virginia as teachers continue their strike.
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The union that represents Los Angeles school cafeteria workers, bus drivers and custodians announced Monday that it will hold a vote to authorize a strike.

The Supreme Court handed President Trump a significant defeat Monday, turning down the administration’s plea for a quick ruling on the president’s power to end special protections for so-called Dreamers.