Coosje van Bruggen
10 Images

Coosje van Bruggen

Coosje van Bruggen
Coosje van Bruggen and her husband, artist Claes Oldenburg, collaborated to build startlingly large sculptures of ordinary objects. Here, they supervise the installation of “Toppling Ladder with Spilling Paint” at Loyola Law School in downtown L.A. in 1986. (Los Angeles Times)
Coosje van Bruggen
Van Bruggen, shown in 1992, was a respected art historian, writer and curator known for her almost scientific approach to looking at an artist’s oeuvre. (Vera Isler)
Coosje van Bruggen
Oldenburg and Van Bruggen’s “Knife Slicing Through Wall” cuts through the top of what was then the Margo Leavin Gallery in Los Angeles. (Los Angeles Times)
Coosje van Bruggen
The couple’s “Binoculars” is the central component of a commercial building in Venice designed by Frank Gehry. (Los Angeles Times)
Coosje van Bruggen
Longtime friends with Gehry, right, Oldenburg and Van Bruggen designed “Collar and Bow,” a sculpture in the shape of a man’s dress shirt collar and bow tie, for a spot outside Gehry’s Walt Disney Concert Hall. But the project was stalled and eventually canceled because of technical problems and escalating costs. (Los Angeles Times)
Coosje van Bruggen
The 65-foot metal and fiberglass bow tie languishes in Irvine. When technical problems delayed the project, a two-year extension was granted, but the second deadline was missed as well. (Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times)
Coosje van Bruggen
Van Bruggen and Oldenburg’s 35-foot broom and dustpan form “The Big Sweep” at the Denver Art Museum. Van Bruggen first worked with Oldenburg in 1976, when she helped him install his 41-foot “Trowel I” in Otterlo, The Netherlands. They were married the next year. (Chris Reynolds / Los Angeles Times)
Coosje van Bruggen
“Spoonbridge and Cherry,” 1988, arches over water in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden at the Walker Art Center. (PaceWildenstein, New York)
Coosje van Bruggen
In San Francisco, “Cupids Span” juts out of Rincon Park. Paul Schimmel, chief curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, said Van Bruggen’s seriousness complemented Oldenburg’s playfulness. (Pace Wildenstein, New York)
Coosje van Bruggen
“Typewriter Eraser, Scale X,” foreground, decorates Seattle. Van Bruggen and Oldenburg were based in New York for many years, but they also lived and worked in Los Angeles and Beaumont-sur-Dême, in the Loire Valley of France. (Seattle Times)
1/10