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451 posts
  • Congressional races
  • 2018 election
(Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee)

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee will begin airing ads in one Orange County congressional district on Tuesday, signaling it’s ready to take a more active role in one of the most competitive open House seats in the country.

According to two media buying sources, the committee is spending nearly $300,000 on cable TV ads, its first to air in any district this midterm season.

In two separate ads, which also include radio buys, the DCCC attacks the records of Republican candidates Bob Huff, a former state senator, and Shawn Nelson, who currently serves on the Orange County Board of Supervisors. Both are vying for a chance to replace retiring GOP Rep. Ed Royce in a crowded race with 17 candidates on the ballot.

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Candidate Katie Hill at the 2018 California Democratic Convention in San Diego.
Candidate Katie Hill at the 2018 California Democratic Convention in San Diego. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

A half-hour Vice News Tonight special on California congressional candidate Katie Hill’s campaign promises behind-the-scenes access to the world of politics in 2018, and it delivers. 

The first-time candidate is seen hunting for votes at the state Democratic Party Convention, preparing for a debate by watching a bit from comedian John Oliver and recounting how her personal life has changed since she entered the crowded race challenging GOP Rep. Steve Knight. Even breakfast with mom has to be scheduled by her campaign manager.

The documentary-style piece, airing on HBO on Monday night, also captures some uncomfortable moments on the trail, including an awkward sex joke made by Hill at the expense of one of her staffers.

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  • California in Congress
Marvin Gaye in concert at the Forum.
Marvin Gaye in concert at the Forum. (Los Angeles Times)

He shaped the sound of Motown in the 1960s and 1970s, and legend Marvin Gaye could soon have a Los Angeles post office carrying his name.

The House of Representatives on Monday approved legislation to name the post office at 4040 W. Washington Blvd. in Gaye’s honor by a voice vote.

Born in Washington, D.C., Gaye scored a series of hit songs from “I Heard It Through the Grapevine” to “Sexual Healing” that topped the record charts for more than 20 years. His song “What’s Going On,” recorded after a fellow soul singer witnessed police brutality at an antiwar rally in Berkeley, was a No. 1 hit in 1971.

  • California Legislature
Assemblymembers David Chiu (D-San Francisco), Joaquin Arambula (D-Fresno), Phil Ting (D-San Francisco) and Jim Wood (D-Healdsburg).
Assemblymembers David Chiu (D-San Francisco), Joaquin Arambula (D-Fresno), Phil Ting (D-San Francisco) and Jim Wood (D-Healdsburg). (Melanie Mason/Los Angeles Times)

As budget negotiating season heats up, Assembly Democrats are making their priorities clear, proposing $1 billion in new healthcare spending that includes expanding Medi-Cal coverage to young adults without legal status and subsidizing insurance premiums for the poor.

The plan was unveiled Monday in advance of the upcoming “May Revise” that details the governor’s updated budget proposal.

“Today’s action shows our commitment as an Assembly to improving our healthcare delivery system,” Assemblyman Joaquin Arambula (D-Fresno) said. The package “makes healthcare more affordable and provides more access to care.”

People mingle for the start of the third and final day of the 2018 California Republican Party Convention and Candidate Fair in San Diego.
People mingle for the start of the third and final day of the 2018 California Republican Party Convention and Candidate Fair in San Diego. (Kent Nishimura Los Angeles Times)
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  • Governor's race
  • 2018 election
  • California Republicans
A convention delegate tries to suspend the rules for a revote between candidates Travis Allen, standing left, and John Cox, center.
A convention delegate tries to suspend the rules for a revote between candidates Travis Allen, standing left, and John Cox, center. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

The California Republican Party declined to offer an endorsement Sunday in the governor’s race, a move that could hurt the chances for GOP voters to coalesce behind a candidate before the June 5 primary election.

Businessman John Cox received 55.3% of the vote, short of the 60% required for the party nod. Assemblyman Travis Allen of Huntington Beach received 40.5%, and 4.1% voted for no endorsement at the party’s convention in San Diego.

With Republicans split between the two candidates, the GOP faces the prospect of failing to advance a candidate to the general election. Failing to launch a GOP candidate to the top of the ticket could also dampen voter turnout in critical congressional races that are key to the party’s effort to hold on to control of the U.S. House of Representatives.

  • 2018 election
  • California Republicans
  • California Democrats
Sen. Joni Ernst (R-Iowa) speaks at the California Republican Party convention on May 5.
Sen. Joni Ernst (R-Iowa) speaks at the California Republican Party convention on May 5. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

Iowa Sen. Joni Ernst took a jab at California politicians, notably Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, as she addressed the state GOP convention on Saturday night.

“It’s odd that I’m coming out to California from Iowa, because what we’ve seen recently is a lot of folks from California coming to Iowa,” she told several hundred delegates and guests gathered in San Diego.

Ernst noted that House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of San Francisco would be fundraising with Iowa Democrats on Sunday, and that Garcetti recently visited the state as he ponders launching a presidential bid.

  • Governor's race
  • 2018 election
  • California Republicans
Travis Allen addresses delegates at the California Republican Party convention.
Travis Allen addresses delegates at the California Republican Party convention. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

Tension has been mounting between the GOP candidates for California governor, but on Saturday the pair largely refrained from criticizing each other as they made their pitches to hundreds of delegates at the state Republican Party convention.

As they spoke at a candidate forum, an attack on a fellow Republican would have led to an airhorn shriek and an immediate end to their speeches. So John Cox and Travis Allen slashed at the Democrats who rule California as they made their cases as to why GOP voters should unify behind their candidacies.

Allen, an assemblyman from Huntington Beach, did his best to hype up the crowd by immediately ripping into the state’s Democratic leaders for California’s deteriorating public schools, increased poverty and homelessness and crumbling roads.

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California Republicans gathering in San Diego for this weekend’s state GOP convention find themselves in a familiar spot: scrambling for ways to resurrect a party sliding toward political irrelevance in this solidly Democratic state.

(Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi on Saturday called for an ethics investigation into San Fernando Valley Democratic Rep. Tony Cárdenas, who this week acknowledged that he is the unnamed defendant in a Jane Doe lawsuit alleging he molested a 16-year-old girl. 

Cárdenas has vehemently denied the allegations, and contacted fellow members of Congress in recent days to assert his innocence in connection with the lawsuit.

In a statement Saturday, Pelosi said Cárdenas “appropriately asked us to withhold judgement until there is a full investigation of the facts.”