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President Trump on Wednesday threatened to delay building border barriers in California until his long-promised wall goes up elsewhere, seemingly slinging another arrow in his running battle with the nation’s most populous state.

“Sections of the Wall that California wants built NOW will not be built until the whole Wall is approved,” Trump declared in a morning message on Twitter.

His threat confused just about everyone involved in the fight over border protection. If the goal was to gain leverage in his fight for the wall, the warning shot seemed oddly aimed: California officials have fought vigorously against Trump’s project, his top priority as a presidential candidate, even going to court to try to block it — an effort that lost a round Tuesday. They haven’t been clamoring for construction of new border fences.

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President Trump and First Lady Melania Trump near the casket of Billy Graham.
President Trump and First Lady Melania Trump near the casket of Billy Graham. (Aaron P. Bernstein / Associated Press)

A casket bearing the body of Billy Graham lay in honor in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda on Wednesday, but it signaled more than the death of a religious leader who had befriended and counseled presidents for decades.

It also marked two historic passages: the political activism by white evangelicals that has redefined the Republican Party, and the threat to that power as their numbers ebb in a changing America.

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For a party halfway in the grave, the news thudded like another shovelful of dirt — thwack! — heaved atop its coffin: The Republican Party may soon slip into third place among registered California voters, trailing Democrats and self-declared independents.

Take the guns first, go through due process second.

In a contentious White House meeting about guns Wednesday, President Trump suggested law enforcement officials should be able to confiscate people’s firearms without a court order to prevent potential tragedies. 

Trump also told lawmakers to send him “one terrific bill” on gun safety, including stronger background checks and restrictions based on one’s age and mental health.

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U.S. Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions.
U.S. Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions. (Toya Sarno Jordan / Getty Images)

President Trump has added “disgraceful” to the list of insults he’s thrown at his own attorney general. But this time, Jeff Sessions, the nation’s top lawman, is pushing back.

Trump, who has shredded long-standing norms by repeatedly attacking his own FBI and Justice Department, on Wednesday tweeted his unhappiness that Sessions had referred charges raised in a memo by House Intelligence Committee Republicans to the Justice Department’s inspector general.

“Will take forever, has no prosecutorial power and already late with reports on Comey etc.” the president complained, referring to an ongoing review of former FBI Director James Comey’s actions during the 2016 election.

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President Trump and his wife, Melania, leave the rotunda after paying homage to evangelist Billy Graham, whose body is lying in honor.
President Trump and his wife, Melania, leave the rotunda after paying homage to evangelist Billy Graham, whose body is lying in honor. (Shawn Thew / EPA/Shutterstock)

A simple wooden casket bearing the body of evangelist Billy Graham was borne by a military unit on Wednesday into the U.S. Capitol and onto a black-draped catafalque in the rotunda, where the confidant of presidents and world leaders was to lie in honor until evening.

President Trump led scores of dignitaries — senators, members of Congress and diplomats — as well as longtime Graham friends in acclaiming the religious leader, who died at age 99 a week ago.

“He took his message to the poorest places, to the downtrodden and to the brokenhearted, to inmates in prison, and to the overlooked and the neglected,” Trump said, standing near the casket during a brief ceremony. 

Nancy Pelosi (D-San Francisco) wields the speaker's gavel after being elected as the first female speaker of the House in 2007.
Nancy Pelosi (D-San Francisco) wields the speaker's gavel after being elected as the first female speaker of the House in 2007. (Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images)

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi’s mark on history will soon become part of the Smithsonian, with a donation of three items related to her swearing-in as the first woman to serve as speaker of the House.

Pelosi will donate a lacquered maple gavel, the burgundy pantsuit she wore and a copy of the speech she gave on the morning of Jan. 4, 2007, to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History. She gave up the job four years later after Republicans won a majority and took control of the House.

Democrats are itching to regain the 24 seats they need to retake the House and potentially put the San Francisco Democrat back in the speaker’s chair during her 17th term in the House.