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A 30% U.S. tariff on imported solar panels put in place last winter should have caused prices here to jump.

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Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo on Sunday sought to downplay North Korea’s harsh complaints about U.S. demands and insisted that negotiations on Pyongyang's nuclear disarmament were making progress.

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Narrowly outnumbered in the Senate, Democrats are embarking on a Hail Mary campaign to block President Trump’s pick for the U.S. Supreme Court.

Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions speaks during a Medal of Valor ceremony in the White House on Feb. 20.
Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions speaks during a Medal of Valor ceremony in the White House on Feb. 20. (Olivier Douliery / TNS)

The Trump administration is moving to rescind Obama-era guidance to colleges and universities on how they can use race in admissions decisions to promote diversity, according to an administration official.

The action, expected Tuesday afternoon, is likely to signal a shift toward advocacy of race-neutral admissions. The Supreme Court has upheld race-conscious admission practices as recently as 2016, but affirmative action in higher education remains a contentious issue.

In 2011 and 2016, the Obama administration's Justice and Education departments jointly spelled out for colleges their view of the law on the voluntary use of race in admissions.

Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo.
Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo. (Kris Tripplaar / TNS)

Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo will travel to North Korea on Thursday to continue talks with Kim Jong Un’s government, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Monday.

Pompeo’s visit follows the historic summit between Kim and President Trump in Singapore in June. The secretary of State, who will be making his third trip to North Korea, will seek answers about Kim’s intentions after new intelligence suggested that his country has continued to ramp up its nuclear capabilities.

The trip represents the highest-level exchange between the two sides since Trump and Kim met and agreed to work toward “complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula,” without establishing a framework or guideposts for achieving that goal. Trump administration officials have deflected criticism of the agreement, describing it as the first step in a negotiated process to persuade Kim to give up his nuclear weapons.

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  • White House
  • Immigration

The White House attacked Sen. Kamala Harris of California on Twitter on Monday over illegal immigration, prompting her to fire back on the administration’s separation of children from their parents after they crossed the border.

The White House accused Harris, a Democrat, of supporting “the animals of MS-13,” a criminal gang that originated in Los Angeles. It offered no evidence for the claim.

Later, Harris responded that she had a long history of combating gangs as a prosecutor, and then slammed Trump for “ripping babies from their mothers.”

Michael Cohen leaves the federal courthouse in Manhattan this year.
Michael Cohen leaves the federal courthouse in Manhattan this year. (Hector Retamal / AFP/Getty Images)

Michael Cohen, President Trump’s longtime lawyer, put some distance between himself and his former client in an interview published on Monday, implying that he wouldn’t hesitate to cooperate with prosecutors even if that hurt the president.

“To be crystal clear, my wife, my daughter and my son and this country have my first loyalty,” he told ABC’s George Stephanopoulos.

Although Cohen has not been charged, he’s the subject of a criminal investigation by the U.S. attorney’s office in Manhattan. Federal agents seized thousands of records from his home, office and hotel room earlier this year, and Cohen is in the process of switching his legal team.

Mexican Foreign Secretary Luis Videgaray this week at the Organisation of American States in Washington.
Mexican Foreign Secretary Luis Videgaray this week at the Organisation of American States in Washington. (Aldo Gamboa / AFP/Getty Images)

Mexico is calling on the United Nations to intervene to prevent the United States from separating immigrant children and parents, the result of the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy.

President Trump last week signed an executive order to end the practice after a global outcry, but the Mexican government made no mention of Trump’s order in a statement released Thursday evening.

The statement said Luis Videgaray, Mexico’s foreign secretary, met Thursday in New York with U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres and urged the U.N. to intervene on the issue.

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  • Immigration
First Lady Melania Trump arrives in Tucson on June 28.
First Lady Melania Trump arrives in Tucson on June 28. (Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press)

First Lady Melania Trump said she's looking forward to speaking with Border Patrol officials and touring an intake facility in Arizona on Thursday.

The first lady said as she sat down with officials at a Border Patrol facility in Tucson that: "I'm here to support you and give my help, whatever I can," on "behalf of children and the families."

She is also expected to meet with children and local members of the community during her second trip to the border amid outrage over her husband's now-suspended policy of separating migrant children from their families when they cross the border illegally.