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1206 posts
  • White House
President Trump meets Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, last year.
President Trump meets Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, last year. (Evan Vucci / Associated Press)

President Trump plans to host Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman at the White House next week, Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders announced Monday.

Prince Mohammed attracted controversy in November when he orchestrated a purge of dozens of people, including sitting cabinet members and a fellow prince. The move was seen as an effort to consolidate power. The regime portrayed the sweep as a crackdown on corruption and an effort to attract foreign investment and reduce the country’s historic dependence on oil. 

Sanders declined to say whether Trump would raise human rights issues with the heir to the throne.

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President Trump’s well-documented clashes with California owe plenty to politics, culture and personality. But at bottom, what drives the president’s toxic relationship with the nation’s most populous state is this: his near-obsessive desire to be seen as a winner.

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Warnings begin as soon as you arrive. Beware of the potholes.

President Trump with congressional candidate Rick Saccone.
President Trump with congressional candidate Rick Saccone. (Keith Srakocic/AP)

Republicans desperate to hold onto a congressional seat in the heart of Trump country received more bad news Monday, just days after the president parachuted into western Pennsylvania to give their struggling candidate a boost.

Republican Rick Saccone, according to a new Monmouth University poll, is still losing ground in Tuesday’s election to fill a vacant seat in the district near Pittsburgh that Trump won by 20 points. Some $8 million in spending by national Republican groups aimed at propping up the state lawmaker hasn’t seemed to give him the boost he badly needs to take a lead against his political-neophyte opponent, Conor Lamb.

The poll found Lamb leading 51% to 45% if turnout reflects the patterns of other similar special elections held this year, in which there was a Democratic surge. Even if turnout is lackluster, as it tends to be for a routine special election, the poll still shows Lamb winning by two points.

Minutes before President Trump entered the White House Roosevelt Room on Thursday to announce sweeping tariffs on imported metals, the president’s economic A-team stood stone-faced near the president’s podium — but not Peter Navarro.

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Rep. Maxine Waters speaks at the California Democrats State Convention on Feb. 24 in San Diego.
Rep. Maxine Waters speaks at the California Democrats State Convention on Feb. 24 in San Diego. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

Treasury Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin on Sunday defended President Trump’s spree of name-calling at a campaign rally on Saturday night, including the president’s renewed mocking of Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Los Angeles) as “a very low IQ individual.”

At the raucous Pennsylvania rally for Republican House candidate Rick Saccone, Trump derided Waters for calling for his impeachment, imitating her as supposedly declaring, “’We will impeach him. We will impeach the president. But he hasn’t done anything wrong. It doesn’t matter, we will impeach him.’”

Mnuchin, appearing on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” said Trump’s verbal assaults were intended to be humorous.

  • North Korea
A South Korean soldier walks past a television screen in Seoul with images of President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.
A South Korean soldier walks past a television screen in Seoul with images of President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. (Jung Yeon-je / AFP/Getty Images)

President Trump tweeted Saturday that he believes North Korea won’t conduct any more missile tests as he plans to meet with the country’s leader, Kim Jong Un.

It was a noteworthy vote of confidence in North Korea’s intentions as the leaders of the two countries prepare for what could be a historic meeting.

North Korea has been testing intercontinental ballistic missiles that may be capable of carrying a nuclear weapon across the Pacific Ocean to the continental United States. 

  • White House
A semiautomatic rifle with a "bump stock" attached.
A semiautomatic rifle with a "bump stock" attached. (Rick Bowmer / Associated Press)

The Trump administration Saturday took a step toward possibly banning “bump stocks,” proposing new regulations to prohibit ownership of the controversial equipment that allows semiautomatic rifles to fire at automatic speeds

Under the proposed rule from the the Department of Justice, bump stocks would be classified as machine guns that are currently banned under federal law.

"President Trump is absolutely committed to ensuring the safety and security of every American,” Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions said in a statement. 

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President Trump reviews a French military parade in Paris in July.
President Trump reviews a French military parade in Paris in July. (Associated Press)

The Pentagon is proposing to stage a military parade in November with soldiers in historic uniforms and warplanes, but no tanks — a scaled-down version of the grand display President Trump wants, according to two officials familiar with the plan.

Pentagon officials have drafted a memo outlining a plan for a parade in Washington on Veterans Day, the officials said. It was first reported by CNN.

Trump earlier this year asked the Defense Department to plan a parade of the U.S. armed forces to celebrate military strength, much like France’s annual French Bastille Day parade that he and First Lady Melania Trump attended in July in Paris as the guests of French President Emmanuel Macron.

  • White House
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and U.S. President Trump have agreed to pursue talks this year.
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and U.S. President Trump have agreed to pursue talks this year. (AFP/Getty Images)

President Trump is open to meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un to discuss his nuclear program, but only under certain conditions, the White House said Friday.

"We’re not going to have this meeting take place until we see concrete actions that match the words and the rhetoric of North Korea,” White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders told reporters.

Sanders made her comment in response to questions about whether Trump had agreed too quickly to a summit meeting — a long-sought goal for the North Koreans — without getting much in return.