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1349 posts
  • Healthcare
  • Domestic policy
  • Politics and polls

Congress hopes to avoid a government shutdown by swiftly approving a stopgap spending bill to allow negotiations to continue for another week on a longer-term funding deal.

But negotiators were still trying to narrow a few unresolved issues -- including aid to Puerto Rico.

The concern is about Puerto Rico's struggling Medicaid program, which is running short on funds and could lead to 900,000 residents losing healthcare coverage by the end of the year. Democrats want to provide Puerto Rico aid, but Trump called it a "bailout."

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  • His schedule
  • Accolades

President Trump posed for a photo opportunity in the Oval Office with the 2017 Teachers of the Year.

In a tweet, Trump called it a "great great honor" to recognize the winning teachers. 

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  • Domestic policy
  • The economy

President Trump signed an executive order on Tuesday aimed at helping U.S. agriculture.

The order establishes a task force that will make sure "regulatory burdens do not unnecessarily encumber agricultural production, harm rural communities, constrain economic growth, hamper job creation, or increase the cost of food for Americans and our customers around the world."

  • Domestic policy
  • The economy

President Trump unveiled a tax blueprint that is similar to the plan he outlined during the campaign last fall.

In proposing to slash business taxes and enact a tax reform of historic proportions, Trump administration officials say they will rely largely on economic growth to make up for the trillions of dollars of lost tax revenue.

But hardly any economist or tax policy analyst outside the administration thinks that the core business piece of Trump’s plan — a reduction in the corporate income tax rate to 15% from the current 35% — will generate anywhere near the growth, job creation and investment needed to pay for itself.

President Trump delivered a sober and uplifting speech recognizing the Holocaust and emphasizing the need to speak out against evil, two weeks after his press secretary apologized for a series of awkward remarks about the dark chapter in Jewish history.

Trump struck a far more formal tone than usual, sticking closely to written remarks in front of a group at the Capitol that included Holocaust survivors and lawmakers as part of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s National Days of Remembrance.

“We must never, ever shrink away from telling the truth about evil in our time,” Trump said.

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  • His cabinet
  • His schedule
  • Domestic policy

President Trump signed an executive order he hopes will give Education Secretary Betsy DeVos the authority to reduce government overreach in K-12 education.

The language seems aimed at the Obama administration, which used funding competitions and the enforcement of civil rights law to have an outsized impact on education nationwide.

It is unclear, however, whether an executive order would in any way expand the limits of DeVos' authority. 

  • Immigration
  • On the media
  • Insults

Though President Trump backed off demands that Congress fund his promised border wall with Mexico after political opposition threatened a government shutdown, he tweeted that building the border wall remains a top priority.

Democrats welcomed Trump's changed course, but it drew swift criticism from conservatives who support the wall as a way to curb illegal immigration, as Trump promised in one of the most prominent issues of his campaign.

“It looks like President Trump is caving on his demand,” talk show host Rush Limbaugh said on his show.

  • Foreign policy
  • The economy

President Trump tweeted criticism of Canada's protected dairy industry right before he slapped hefty duties on billions of dollars of lumber imported from the longtime ally, the largest purchaser of U.S. exports. 

The new duties came amid sharp rhetoric by Trump and his senior officials critical of the the North American Free Trade Agreement. Opening Canada’s dairy market is expected to be a major issue of contention in the NAFTA renegotiations.

Later in the day, the president told reporters: "People don't realize Canada's been very rough on the United States ... they've outsmarted our politicians for years."

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  • Domestic policy

President Trump signed an executive order intended to eventually reduce or eliminate some national monument designations, in particular those that are at least 100,000 acres.

The monuments received federal protection under Presidents Clinton, George W. Bush and Obama under the 1906 Antiquities Act, which gives presidents the power to limit use of public land for historic, cultural, scientific or other reasons.

The order could affect more than two dozen monuments that have been established since 1996.

  • Immigration
  • Insults
  • Courts
  • Travel ban

President Trump plans to fight a judge's decision to freeze his order threatening federal funding to state and local governments that refuse to cooperate fully with immigration agents.

"See you in the Supreme Court!," Trump tweeted.

U.S. District Judge William H. Orrick III ruled that Trump's order to cut some federal funding to so-called sanctuary cities and counties was unconstitutional.