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Continued storms prompt flash flood warnings, add to mudslides

A flash flood warning was issued Monday morning for portions of the Woolsey Fire burn area as more storms moved their way into Southern California, and the Pacific Coast Highway is closed due to debris on the roadway.

The warning will be in place for several areas including Thousand Oaks, Agoura Hills and Oak Park, until 12:15 p.m. according to a tweet from the National Weather Service.

Forecasters are calling for two storms to arrive Monday, dropping between 0.5 and 1 inch of rain on the coasts and valleys, the National Weather Service stated.

Periods of heavy rain are expected with Monday’s storm.

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Showers are likely to continue off and on until Wednesday morning, when drier weather should move into the region, according to the Weather Service.

Road Closures

Caltrans was forced to shut down Pacific Coast Highway from Broad Beach Road in Malibu to Las Posas Road in Ventura County Monday morning due to debris in the roadway. Motorists were asked to use alternate routes and be cautious of possible mudslides.

A mudslide Sunday night prompted officials to close Topanga Canyon Boulevard from Grandview Drive to Pacific Coast Highway.

There was no word on when the roadway would reopen.

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Caltrans also tweeted about several other road closures they would be monitoring during the storms.

A construction crew working on Yerba Buena Road Saturday was left without a front-loader after a hole in the street opened up, dropping the vehicle several feet down.

The man working the front-loader was not inside when it crashed through the street.

Snow levels dropping

Temperatures are expected to be below normal early this week leading to plummeting snow levels.

Currently around 5,000 to 6,000 feet, forecasters expect snow between 3,500 to 4,500 feet by Tuesday morning. Snow levels may be as low as 2,500 feet by Wednesday, according to the Weather Service.

Kurzweil, Telles and Pascucci work for KTLA.


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