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New year, new goals for schools

Molly Shore

New Year’s resolutions often fall by the wayside before the end of

January, but school board members and district officials hope their

goals for 2003 remain intact throughout the year.

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On board President Richard Raad’s list are bettering communication

between the district and the community and finishing modernization

work throughout the district.

“We’re trying to bring to a swift completion all of the work that

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has been going very well and is ahead of schedule,” Raad said.

Raad also wants to continue strong academic performances by

students and maintain safety in the schools.

“The uncomfortable part that we all have to deal with is asking

what is transpiring with the state budget and how it will affect

Burbank, and how it will least affect the delivery of the educational

services,” Raad said.

Financial stability is also on the mind of board member Trish

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Burnett.

“I hope that the state is more generous toward schools than it

looks like [Gov. Gray] Davis intends to be,” Burnett said.

Strides have been made in the district’s curriculum in recent

years, and Burnett and fellow board member Elena Hubbell expect it to

continue.

“My number one goal is to ensure that students continue the

progress that they have made academically,” Hubbell said.

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Also on her wish list is to bring teachers’ salaries up to more

competitive levels.

Sustaining the growth in student performance is a continuing goal

for the school district in 2003, Supt. Gregory Bowman said.

“It’s not just about test scores,” he said. “It’s about learning.”

Preparing young people to be successful as they go through school

and beyond is the commitment and goal of the district’s educators,

Bowman said.

“Students have to be very well prepared, not just in technology,

but in math, science and reading, which sparks the imagination,”

Bowman said.

The superintendent is discouraged though, because fewer

universities are vying for students since enrollment at such

institutions is at an all-time high, he said.


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