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Senior day care center reopens

Molly Shore

A nonprofit day care center for seniors with Alzheimer’s or

Parkinson’s disease that closed twice previously will reopen next

month with a new operator and a new name.

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Burbank Adult Service and Resource Center, which closed in

February for financial reasons, will reopen July 1 and be called

Community Assistance Program for Seniors (CAPS), said Linda Crane,

chief executive officer of the Burbank-based Schutrum-Piteo

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Foundation.

The foundation, which ran the day care facility under the former

name, has contracted with the Center for Aging Resources in Pasadena

to take over the center’s daily operation. But until the center is

licensed to operate the Burbank facility, it will be run by the

foundation, Crane said.

“It’s a wonderful organization,” Crane said. “They have 20 years

of experience with CAPS in Pasadena and West Covina.”

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The foundation will offer scholarship money for people who cannot

afford the $50 per-day fees. A recent foundation fund-raiser at The

Colony Theatre raised more than $10,000 for the scholarship fund,

Crane said.

Cynthia Jackson, Center for Aging Resources executive director,

said the Burbank facility will be open a minimum of two days a week

to start.

“As soon as the need is evident, we’ll open five days a week,” she

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said.

To operate Monday through Friday, Jackson said it will be

necessary to have a minimum of four clients. Crane says 16 clients

have signed up so far.

“Our goal, no matter what, is to have it up and running and

serving the community,” Jackson said.

But Christine Bevis, whose mother, Ruth, was a client twice before

at the day care facility, said she is no longer interested in taking

her mother back.

“These are people’s lives, you can’t just take people who are so

sick like that and yank them around like that and expect them to

survive,” Bevis said. “People with Alzheimer’s don’t understand

change.”


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