A side-by-side comparison of Obamacare and the GOP’s replacement plan

A guide to what’s covered under the Affordable Care Act and the proposed Republican healthcare plan

More uninsured

The Republican plan to replace the Affordable Care Act would remove health coverage for an estimated 24 million Americans by 2026, according to independent analysis by the Congressional Budget Office. The hardest hit in the long run would be lower-income Americans and those nearing retirement. Lawmakers from both parties rely on the nonpartisan budget office to gauge the potential impact of legislation.

Number of uninsured could nearly double under GOP plan by 2026
Number of uninsured could nearly double under GOP plan by 2026 0 20 40 60 million 2026 2025 2024 2023 2022 2021 2020 2019 2018 2017 If Obamacare is kept If Republican plan is adopted 28 million 52 million
Number of uninsured could nearly double under GOP plan by 2026
0 20 40 60 million 2026 2022 2017 If Obamacare is kept If Republican plan is adopted 28 million 52 million

Impact on deficit

The legislation also would reduce the deficit by $337 billion over the next 10 years largely from Medicaid reductions and the elimination of the ACA's subsidies for nongroup health insurance, the CBO found.

Annual impact on federal deficit
2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 -100 -30 $40 billion 0

Changes in insurance subsidies

Who wins and who loses under the Republican proposal depends on a few factors. In a nutshell, the new system would provide less help to low-income people and those in high-cost areas. According to a Kaiser Family Foundation study, an American who is older, has lower income and lives in an area with higher premiums like Alaska or Arizona will lose out if the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, is replaced. An American who is younger, has higher income and lives in areas with lower premiums like Massachusetts or Washington may receive additional assistance under the replacement plan.

Change in assistance between Obamacare and the Republican plan*

27 Age $20,000 $30,000 -$3,000 +$3,000 -$2,000 +$2,000 -$1,000 +$1,000 No change $40,000 $50,000 $75,000 $100,000 Annual income 40 60

Change in assistance between the ACA and Republican replacement