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La Cañada officials bash plans for July 6 house party through enforcement, injunctions

Crescenta Valley Sheriff’s Station Det. Alan Chu investigates Tuesday a house at 4465 Gould Avenue,
Crescenta Valley Sheriff’s Station Det. Alan Chu investigates on June 18 a house at 4465 Gould Avenue, where squatters were allegedly living without the owner’s permission when a June 15 for-profit pool party provoked resident concerns and calls for service.
(Sara Cardine / La Cañada Valley Sun)

La Cañada residents breathed a sigh of relief this holiday weekend after a for-profit house party scheduled to take place somewhere in town Saturday was apparently thwarted by warnings from the sheriff’s department and legal action taken by city officials.

City Manager Mark Alexander and Crescenta Valley Sheriff’s Station Detective Alan Chu confirmed Monday no reports or calls came in over the weekend regarding any activity near the Gould Avenue home where a similar such party was held on June 15, nor in any other La Cañada neighborhood.

For-profit party at La Cañada house leads officials to a homeowner battling squatters »

“We did a lot to shut this thing down,” said Chu, explaining that city officials requested two additional patrol units over the Fourth of July weekend.

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In the days leading up to the July 6 “Soak City 2K19” mansion pool party advertised online, Alexander assured La Cañada Flintridge City Council members the city’s prosecuting attorney had sought an injunction against any commercial party being held on the property in violation of a municipal code prohibiting for-profit events at residences.

Chu said a temporary restraining order was delivered to the homeowner, who told the Valley Sun on June 18 the property he purchased in late April was being illegally occupied by squatters, as well as the individual identified as an organizer.

The detective said Monday sheriff’s officials determined the occupants did not have a legal right to be on the premises and had vacated the house.

“They’d moved everything out, and the front door was locked,” Chu said.

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