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Burbank Cultural Arts Commission showcases local artists’ work in exhibit

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“L’accord de Paris” by Glen Farrelly is one of the art pieces being featured in the “Hidden Jewels” art exhibit hosted by the Burbank Cultural Arts Commission at the Betsy Lueke Creative Arts Center. The sculpture is made out of burned wood from one of the local fires.
(Courtesy of Virginia Causton-Keene)

The Burbank Cultural Arts Commission has been at the forefront of cultivating art culture in the city.

Whether it’s a dance flash mob at the Burbank Town Center or finding more utility boxes to be painted, the Cultural Arts Commission has been trying to ensure that artists of any medium can flourish.

To continue that mission, the commission is hosting its first-ever art exhibit at the Betsy Lueke Creative Arts Center, 1100 W. Clark Ave., from Friday through Feb. 27.

The juried exhibit, titled “Hidden Jewels,” features about 70 pieces from roughly 50 artists from Burbank and surrounding communities, Virginia Causton-Keene, director of the creative arts center, said on Tuesday.

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Members of the Cultural Arts Commission will hostan opening reception on Friday at 7 p.m., when they will announce the winners of the exhibit.

Causton-Keene said the exhibit’s entries are impressive and showcase the talents of all of the artists in their various media — including paintings, photography and sculptures.

One piece that Causton-Keene said she is excited about is a sculpture made by Glen Farrelly called “L’accord de Paris.” Causton-Keene said it was made using burnt wood that was found from one of the local wildfires last year.

“He hiked up the local mountains and found these pieces of wood and integrated other pieces of wood to make the sculpture,” Causton-Keene said. “I think it’s quite striking and has a really lovely connection to the city.”

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Causton-Keene said she’s happy to see the Cultural Arts Commission is finding different ways to highlight artists in the community.

“They’ve been really proactive about keeping art alive in Burbank,” Causton-Keene said. “There are many commissioners that are really trying to push for that.”

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