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Reruns that don’t make it on screen

Laura Sturza

While the entertainment industry is known for producing sequels of

popular films, it also finds ways to reuse props, clothes and other

supplies it no longer needs -- by giving them to local nonprofit

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groups.

“Computers, desks, file cabinets, art supplies, wood, paper, paint

-- all of it that is excess gets donated,” said T.J. Baptie, Disney

vice president for corporate relations. “We try to donate everything

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and give it new life.”

The studio often gets requests for a specific item, and tries to

meet the need, or refer the group to another studio that might have

it, Baptie said.

Since Burbank is home base, the city’s studios try to make

donations locally.

“I get a lot of [requests], but as a Burbank resident, I try to

keep it in Burbank,” said Jack O’Neill, NBC vice president of

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facilities.

Whenever food, wardrobe, computers or other items are left over,

NBC staff makes “calls around the neighborhood,” with schools at the

top of the list.

Used items are not the only ones donated, with Warner Bros.’

“Second Time Around -- A Community Reuse Partnership” contributing

trees to Providencia Elementary School. The school particularly

appreciated the studio employees who volunteered to help with the

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planting, Principal Amin Oria said.

“In a time when we have severe budget cuts, any additional support

that we can receive from the community really is welcome,” Oria said.

"[It makes] the difference in providing an even higher quality of

education for our students.”

The four staffers for the Warner Bros. program search out groups

that can make the best use of materials, such as a youth group that

received a box of children’s boots, said Shelley Billik, vice

president of environmental initiatives.

“Burbank is generally on the top of our list because it’s our own

backyard -- this is where we live and work and we like to contribute

to our own community” Billik said. “The most satisfying part is

knowing that we can make a difference socially, environmentally and

economically.”


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