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Ben GodarMusic was in the air and...

Ben Godar

Music was in the air and on display as sunny skies shined on this

year’s Burbank on Parade.

Saturday’s event, themed “Music Makes the World Go Around,”

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marched its way down Olive Avenue as hundreds of spectators watched

from curbside.

The Burbank Girl Scouts were among the participants focusing on

the parade theme, and were awarded the President’s Trophy for best

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entry.

Nearly 400 scouts, ranging from 5-year-olds to adults, rode

flat-bed trucks or walked along the parade route singing Girl Scout

songs, event director Diane McKinley said. The trucks were decorated

with giant musical notes and some scouts were dressed as boxes of

Girl Scout cookies.

McKinley said the group has placed within its category at previous

parades, but did not expect to be presented with the parade’s top

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honor.

“We figured we wouldn’t get anything this year, then when they

announced we won the President’s award, we were flabbergasted,” she

said.

One of the most notable entries in this year’s parade was the

Hempfield Area High School Spartan Marching Band from Greensburg, Pa.

Considered one of the premier marching bands in the country, the

group did not disappoint, parade president Sally Hooper said.

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“We’ve never had a big band like that here before and they were

phenomenal,” she said.

While the Hempfield marchers and several other local bands put

music in the air, Hooper said the theme was carried by most entrants

in the event, making this year’s parade more cohesive than in past

years.

“So many of our entrants really went out of their way to

incorporate the theme, and that was really enjoyable,” she said.

This year’s parade was also the first time organizers have

provided a crafts fair and other family activities at George Izay

Park following the march. The additional activities were a big hit,

and organizers plan to bring them back next year, Hooper said.


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