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Don’t take yourself to this ‘Day Care’

SOUNDED BETTER ON PAPER, MAYBE

Dean Briggs of Glendale is a photographer and painting contractor.

I was waiting for the real laughs to begin while I was watching

Eddie Murphy’s latest movie “Daddy Day Care,” but they never came.

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I’ll bet that on paper this movie tickled somebody’s funny bone a few

times, but on the screen the movie’s laughs pour like molasses.

Murphy and Jeff Garlin play two ad men for a cereal conglomerate

who suddenly find themselves fired from their jobs. Of course, a

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Daddy Day Care Center is the only job they can figure out to do.

Angelica Huston, who plays yet another of her witch-like

villainess roles, runs an elite preschool and sets out to derail the

newly successful Daddy Day Care, which is cutting into her business.

This movie goes for the easy laughs and emotions and feels and

plays like a cookie-cutter bore of yet another, “Whatever happened to

the REAL Eddie Murphy?”

ONLY A FEW SCENES WERE AMUSING

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Natalie Briggs, 10, is a fifth-grader at Mark Keppel Elementary

School and is the daughter of fellow critic Dean Briggs.

“Daddy Day Care” is about a guy named Charlie Hinton (Eddie

Murphy) who has enough money because of his job to buy anything he

wants. He works in a health division of a cereal company and one of

his projects is to make a cereal that tastes like broccoli and

carrots.

One day, they were not doing so well because the children who

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tried it thought it tasted terrible. Charlie and his friend, Phil

(Jeff Garlin), get fired from their jobs.

Now, Charlie doesn’t have enough money to buy anything he wants

anymore. They decide to open a day care center.

I think it wasn’t a very funny movie, but it had some scenes that

I liked. I liked it when the little boy named Ben spends time with

his father, Charlie.

On a scale of 1 to 10, I think the movie is a 6.

“Daddy Day Care” is rated PG for language.

* If you would like to become a Reel Critic and see a movie on the

newspaper’s tab, call entertainment editor Joyce Rudolph at 637-3241.


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