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Opinion

Letters: Thanks to Rudolph for her courage; thumbs up — and down — to other Burbank news

Joyce Rudolph updated mugshot, 06.03.19. (Courtesy of Joyce Rudolph)
“I want to say ‘thank you’ to Joyce for being an inspiration to all of us,” writes Burbank resident Larry Stamper, one of five contributors to this week’s Mailbag.
(Courtesy of Joyce Rudolph)

I am writing to say “thank you” to Joyce Rudolph for sharing her story about her fight with cancer.

Joyce has been a gift to our community for many years. Her writing has always been positive and upbeat. She is known for her quick smile, sense of humor and genuine love for Burbank.

When she wrote that she’d learned she was in remission, I rejoiced with her. In reading her August article, I cried for her. Yet, she had the courage to write an upbeat piece, full of hope and honesty and openness about her fight.

I want to say “thank you” to Joyce for being an inspiration to all of us and let her know we are hoping and praying for her.

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Larry Stamper
Burbank

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At the end of August, Burbank will lose a business that has served our family for over 40 years, and the community for almost 60 years. Thrifty Appliance Repair on Magnolia will shut its doors.

I regret their decision but appreciate that they have been here as long as they have. In a state (California) ranked 48th in the cost of doing business and 50th as a state friendly to business, I’m appreciative of and respect anyone who starts and maintains a business that benefits my life.

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Thank you, Thrifty, for doing just that.

Jane Shaffer
Burbank

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I wish our city leaders would react as vehemently and with outrage to ongoing and worsening affordable housing shortage, high apartment rents and homelessness as they have reacted against President Trump’s tweets.

Criticizing President Trump in California is politically safe and does not cost any votes to local politicians. But criticizing the existing suburban housing model and current land use and zoning regulations that create a monopoly for single-family detached housing construction, and favoring expansion of mixed-use occupancy zones, well, that’s a big hot potato that requires courage, grit and leadership to handle.

Will we ever see members of the Burbank City Council write letters to newspapers defending expansion of mixed-use occupancy zones, increasing the supply of apartments, and giving incentives to developers and investors to build more apartments?

Albric Ghokasian
Burbank

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With their letters to the editor last week, Mayor Emily Gabel-Luddy and Vice Mayor Sharon Springer demonstrated courage in their decision to protest an ill-conceived presidential comment that was directed at several members of Congress. The racist statement, unworthy of a 10-year-old but issued from the highest office of the land, was heard around the world. This and other dangerous and inflammatory statements such as “Journalists are the Enemy of the State” and “I wish someone would punch that guy in the face” have the effect of legitimizing and empowering extremist agendas that until recently were only acceptable in the realm of the unhinged. It is no coincidence that hate crimes have risen by 200%.

I frequently work in neighborhoods such as Mission Hills, Sylmar, San Fernando and Crenshaw. The majority of homeowners in these areas have shown kindness and respect, and are law-abiding citizens; but many are living in fear. I grew up in a suburb of the Bay Area that was approximately 50/50 black and white, and all the families, regardless of color, took the same pride in their homes and children.

Tolerance and inclusiveness are American values. On one hand are those who believe that “they” are “all murderers and robbers” and would vote for anyone (regardless of a shady past or dubious qualifications) who promises to get rid of the “outsiders.” On the other are those who have lived and worked beside people of color and different beliefs, who understand that we have a lot in common.

Jennifer Rabuchin
Burbank

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I respectfully suggest the city should not send a letter to the president of the United States regarding his tweet about the four female members of Congress. It would make Burbank look like a cartoon and — if he were to read such a letter— the city could become a target of the president’s animus.

I’ve been a Burbank resident since 1974 and never have I seen such a lack of judgment on the part of Burbank elected officials. The proposed letter is moronic. Further, we have no authority to censor his speech. So now we, the little city of Burbank, are thinking of asking Trump to apologize as if we are a whistle-toting playground monitor charged with telling Donny he is a bad boy. Be wise, members of the City Council: don’t embarrass yourselves and the citizens of this wonderful town.

Jim Nichols
Burbank

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I received a letter from the American Kidney Fund warning me that if legislation being voted on in the State Capitol becomes law, it will jeopardize my health insurance and kidney dialysis treatment. I will lose my health coverage because AB 290 (authored by Jim Wood, D-Healdsburg) would force AKF out of the state and discontinue the financial assistance it provides to me.

I rely on AKF’s assistance because although I have been fortunate enough to have received a kidney transplant, I still depend on the charitable premium assistance provided to me by AKF and will through the end of this year. I began dialysis treatment in 2012 after my kidneys failed due to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, which caused significant scar tissue development in my kidneys.

My entire life changed when I started at home peritoneal dialysis, while simultaneously working full time as a bookkeeper to keep up with my expenses. My illness strained my finances, so I turned to AKF two years ago for help paying my Medicare and employer group health premiums. I was listed for transplant at a San Diego hospital and received a kidney earlier this year after commuting to San Diego for four years for waiting list checkups from my home in Burbank. Although I am almost through the period in my life where I will rely on AKF’s assistance to make ends meet, I know how important assistance is for other patients who are going through the same struggles I have already overcome.

I never imagined this could happen to me. It could happen to anyone. I’m grateful for an organization that cares and has been able to help financially. Life has been difficult enough with kidney failure, AB 290 would exacerbate the hardship dialysis patients already face.

Betsie Landos
Burbank


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