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Photo Gallery: Tattoo exhibit at Cal State Fullerton
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Photo Gallery: Tattoo Exhibit at Cal State Fullerton

Photo Gallery: Tattoo exhibit at Cal State Fullerton

From left, Candice Daniel, Citlalli Hidrogo, Victoria Ramirez and Haley Ruiz color tattoo outlines on March 17. The Cal State Fullerton students helped install the “Tattooed & Tenacious: Inked Women in California’s History” exhibit as part of the anthropology museum practicum class at Cal State Fullerton.

 (Scott Smeltzer / Weekend)
Photo Gallery: Tattoo exhibit at Cal State Fullerton

Trisha Campbell, an anthropology professor, discusses the exhibit “Tattooed & Tenacious: Inked Women in California’s History” at Cal State Fullerton.

 (Scott Smeltzer / Weekend)
Photo Gallery: Tattoo Exhibit at Cal State Fullerton

Betty Broadbent was a famous tattoed woman of the 1930s. She wore more than 350 distinct designs. Her photo is part of the “Tattooed & Tenacious: Inked Women in California’s History” exhibit at Cal State Fullerton.

 (Scott Smeltzer / Weekend )
Photo Gallery: Tattoo exhibit at Cal State Fullertone

Maud Wagner was the first non-Native American woman known to tattoo. Her photo is on display at the “Tattooed & Tenacious: Inked Women in California’s History” exhibit at Cal State Fullerton.

 (Scott Smeltzer / Weekend)
Photo Gallery: Tattoo exhibit at Cal State Fullerton

Candice Daniel colors tattoo outlines on March 17. The outlines are an interactive part of the “Tattooed & Tenacious: Inked Women in California’s History” exhibit at Cal State Fullerton.

 (Scott Smeltzer / Weekend)
Photo Gallery: Tattoo exhibit at Cal State Fullerton

This photo taken in 1903 depicts O Che Che, a Mohave woman who wears a chin tattoo made of five straight lines. The photo is part of the exhibit “Tattooed & Tenacious: Inked Women in California’s History” at Cal State Fullerton.

 (Scott Smeltzer / Weekend)
Photo Gallery: Tattoo exhibit at Cal State Fullerton

Cal State Fullerton students in the anthropology museum practicum class helped put together the exhibit “Tattooed & Tenacious: Inked Women in California’s History” at Cal State Fullerton. 

 (Scott Smeltzer / Weekend)
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