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Los Angeles Times

Mailbag: Dump dirt, debris into Irwindale pits

In regards to trucks hauling tons of dirt and rocks from nearby catch basins and dumping it at a "sediment site," which may be endangering nearby residents, has anyone considered dumping all this material in the huge pits in Irwindale?

These pits were created as a result of gravel mining and are a terrible eyesore. They are so large that I'll bet it would take 100 years to fill them.

STEVEN ASIMOW

Glendale


Don't ignore legal part of immigrationI thought I had head everything until I read Joe Zuazua's contribution on illegal immigration ("This country has an 'illegal' history," May 20).

He states that "we 'must know' history." Zuazua would do well to do a little research of his own. The people who stepped off the Mayflower were not entering a sovereign nation with a system of laws. To attempt to compare the people of the Mayflower and their descendants to the illegal immigrants sneaking across our border is really grasping at straws.

I beg to differ regarding his other statement that "much of the U.S. population who are of European ancestry are from illegal immigrants who came running from oppression and looking for a better life." My Italian grandfather applied for papers, got in line and was processed through Ellis Island as a legal immigrant who went on to obtain his citizenship.

I don't deny that much of the world is indeed looking for a better life, but it is virtually impossible for the United States to admit everyone who wants to enter! Just because somebody manages to enter our country illegally does not mean they are "home free," and should be afforded the same rights and privileges as a legal, tax-paying citizen!

The very word "legal" is something the illegal immigration protest groups conveniently ignore.

ELIZABETH MORNER

Glendale


Burbank's store is day-worker freeAs a resident of Glendale I have stopped patronizing the Home Depot in Glendale. Why? Well, I was tired of the harassment by the "day workers" upon entering and exiting the parking lot on San Fernando Road.

The whistling, yelling, hand-waving and even approaching my vehicle is too much.

So, what do I do? I give my business to the Burbank Home Depot where the area is clean and free of harassment "day workers" — not one to be seen or heard. Why there is this wide disparity of how the day workers are handled between the two cities is a mystery to me. However, for my safety and stress level, it is the Burbank Home Depot for me.

I recommend readers give it a try. There is a major difference.

CAROLE WELING

Glendale

College aid has its pros and consThe expansion of federal aid for college students by President Obama presents positive and negative sides ("Optimism in college aid," April 2).

The reformed financial aid policy is great in terms of it becoming much simpler, and being offered to a broader range of middle-class students. Yet, many people agree that the financial aid system is often abused.

The double-edged-sword scenario of this system is that fewer complications and regulations, the number of financial aid students will tremendously increase, and so will the abusers. I strongly believe that the system is broken, and unless some sort of regulation is adopted, then it will fall into the footsteps of our failing welfare system.

The problem is that there are too many loopholes, and it's extremely difficult or near impossible to know who is rightfully using the money for educational purposes and who is not.

DANNY YESAYAN

Glendale

Taxpayers shouldn't pay for searchI'm sure I won't be the only reader who takes exception to your May 22 editorial, "Don't punish Salases."

While I am truly glad this disappearance ended happily for the Salas family, I don't feel the taxpayers should be saddled with the cost of a futile search for a 22-year-old who found it easier to run than face the consequences of her actions.

Frankly, I was shocked at her father's statement that he wouldn't have any questions for her. I can assure you, there would be a lot of questions if this had happened in our family. Questions such as, what have you been doing with your time these past two years, what happened to the tuition and fees we thought we were paying, why didn't you enroll in another college? And many more.

At a time when city resources are spread thin, it's outrageous that the News-Press suggests we just ignore this expense. The family shouldn't be required to pay restitution; that's Nancy's responsibility, and she should be given the option of paying the bill in cash or working it off by volunteering at a school, police station or senior citizen center at an appropriate hourly rate and held to it until the bill is paid in full.

To simply let her walk away teaches her nothing and penalizes the rest of us.

JOAN FARLEY

Glendale

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