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The Whiteboard Jungle: Does President Trump tweet for posterity?

Newly inaugurated U.S. presidents are often judged by the work completed in their first 100 days of office.

We can judge President Trump by the first 100 tweets of his presidency.

George Bennett of the Palm Beach Post reported that "more than half his tweets end with an exclamation point and more than one-quarter [have] at least one word in all capital letters."

Take a look.

"Enjoy the Super Bowl and then we continue: MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN!"

"Iran has been formally PUT ON NOTICE for firing a ballistic missile. Should have been thankful for the terrible deal the U.S. made with them!"

"If U.C. Berkeley does not allow free speech and practices violence on innocent people with a different point of view – NO FEDERAL FUNDS?"

"I will send in the Feds!"

"FAKE NEWS"

Words matter. They can threaten or they can heal.

Feb. 12 will be the 208th anniversary of the birth of Abraham Lincoln, whose words still endure today.

Acclaimed documentarian Ken Burns made "The Address" in 2014 about the Greenwood School in Putney, Vt., a small boarding school for boys with learning disabilities who each year recite Lincoln's Gettysburg Address as a rite of passage that demonstrates their confidence to overcome their challenges.

In 272 words, it may be the best-written speech by any president under two minutes.

He uses the rule of three twice, done to perfection: "We can not dedicate — we can not consecrate — we can not hallow — this ground" and the famous coda "government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the Earth."

Lincoln was not the featured speaker when the battlefield was dedicated as a cemetery on Nov. 19, 1863. Edward Everett, noted orator of the time, spoke for two hours first, then came Lincoln.

The photographer assumed Lincoln would speak longer allowing him more time to focus his camera on the president. By the time he took the photograph, Lincoln had just sat down.

Little did Americans know at the time that the Civil War would continue for almost two more years.

And it wasn't until years later that Lincoln's words would burn an indelible mark in the American story. In fact, before he was assassinated, many in the country disliked Lincoln. After his murder, however, his reputation rose.

This year, I had my English students learn about Lincoln and recite the speech.

After they finished, I asked them their thoughts.

"I loved presenting this speech and learning about it and the person behind it," one student wrote.

"It inspires people and reminds us how great Lincoln was" that "he was able to bring the country together," remarked another.

The speech showed "how much he cared about his country," how "he cared about the American people deeply" was another comment

He "was very intelligent and eloquent" who "showed compassion" and "loved his country;" "a good, true, honorable man," another student wrote.

And one student said "funny how in the speech, Lincoln says 'the world will little note, nor long remember what we say here' but people still remember the speech today."

If only our chief executive could word his thoughts as well as a 15-year-old high school student.

Indeed, in the turbulent times we live in where there is a pervasive dark mood, it is comforting to read the words of someone who truly led a divided nation.

When he was assassinated on April 15, 1865, he had recently turned 56 years old. Even with an additional 14 years of life, Trump has a lot of catching up to do before his memorial ever breaks ground on the National Mall.

Over 150 years from now, will a Trump tweet be recited by school children, examined as one of the finest collection of words coming from a president?

Take a break from all the bad news and read over the Gettysburg Address to honor Abraham Lincoln and to remind yourself that we are all Americans.

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BRIAN CROSBY is a teacher in the Glendale Unified School District and the author of "Smart Kids, Bad Schools" and "The $100,000 Teacher." He can be reached at briancrosby.org.

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