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Monday briefings

SMOKE AND MIRRORS

Businessman Keith Swaner said he’s always tried to teach his two

children and seven grandchildren the importance of going to college,

despite the fact that he’s a multimillionaire who dropped out of Hoover

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High School to fight in World War II.

“I tell them, ‘Things are different now than when I was their age,”’

he said. “Today, without knowledge of computers and such, you’re lost.”

Swaner added, pointing to a blank computer screen on his desk, “I have

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this thing, but it’s just for show.”

Swaner said his words might have been more persuasive than one would

think, since both his children and two of his grandchildren have

graduated from college. Four of his grandchildren are now in college.

You go, Grandpa.

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE SWING

At a recent Pre-Dating event -- a singles service that involves 10 men

and 10 women swapping dates every 5 minutes -- one participant said

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offering charming and witty conversation for the duration of the

mini-date isn’t hard after the first few turns.

According to him, experience is everything.

“It’s like the Back Nine in golf,” he said. “By then you have your

swing down. You know what to say and what not to say.”

UUHHH ...

At a Foothill Design Committee and Historical Society meeting,

committee Co-chairman Richard Toyon was multiplying figures out loud to

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determine the height of a building.

The numbers eventually got too big, and Toyon solicited help from the

30 or so other adults in the meeting.

His request was met with a long, silent pause, as each person in

attendance pondered the multiplication problem over in their heads.

“A big number,” someone finally answered.

SPEED DEMON

Lincoln Elementary School hosted the “Lincoln 500,” an event where

select students race Indianapolis 500 style on plastic tricycles.

Straggling students played around on the tricycles after the event,

which was attended by officers from the Glendale Police Department.

Suddenly one student stopped riding, stood up and turned around.

A Glendale Police officer on a motorcycle had playfully crept up

behind him, siren blaring, pulling the unsuspecting student over for

“speeding.”

OFF THE BOAT, ONTO THE BIKE

The Wheels of Freestyle Bicycle Thrill Show, a touring company based

in San Diego, visited Glenoaks Elementary School Thursday.

The group performed tricks and ramp jumps on BMX bikes for a crowd of

cheering students.

Rider Tony “BBT” Roberts was having a rough day, falling hard several

times after executing extremely difficult tricks and jumping off of a

six-foot ramp.

But Roberts shrugged it off.

“I’ve spent the last five years on a fishing boat, fishing in

competitions. I just came out here for fun,” Roberts said.

GETTING THEIR FILL

Participants found it a hard order to take full advantage of the

samples laid out at the 19 participating restaurants at the inaugural A

Taste of Downtown Glendale fund-raiser.

The event raised money for Glendale Healthy Kids, an organization that

helps children of uninsured families get access to health services.

“My stomach is getting pretty full and we still have a lot left,” one

woman moaned.

ALL THEY CAN EAT

A fund-raising committee for the Glendale Police Memorial at the

headquarters under construction announced on Thursday that more than

$200,000 has been raised.

A variety of events has been planned between now and the Oct. 19

dedication of the new station, committee Chairman Sheldon Baker said.

Not the least of which is rib-eating contest July 18 between Glendale

police and firefighters, Baker said.

“We’ll see them at the table,” Glendale Fire Battalion Chief Don

Wright said.

As compiled by GRETCHEN HOFFMAN, KAREN S. KIM, JANINE MARNIEN and GARY

MOSKOWITZ.


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