MAILBAG

Glendale needs rent control

Today, we are living in a recession — everyone tries to cut their expenses as much as possible. However, they cannot do anything about their major monthly expense — the rent.

Rent control is a law practiced in some cities. It limits the increase of rents and protects tenants from eviction.

Some cities in California, such as Los Angeles, Santa Monica and Beverly Hills have rent control, but, unfortunately in Glendale, there is no rent control. Therefore, the landlords raise the rent whenever they want.

Without rent control, tenants are threatened that the landlords will raise the rent any time they want, and if the tenants are not happy, they don’t have another choice than to leave and find another place. However, tenants don’t have a choice, because in Glendale, finding an apartment is not easy, and there is no guarantee for a fixed rent.

Today, because of our financial and economic situation, lots of families prefer to rent an apartment instead of buying.

Also, lots of people have become tenants after losing their own houses.

Landlords benefit from this situation, and tenants cannot do anything but pay whatever the landlord demands.

The city of Glendale is very loved. It is one of the safest cities in California, but we need a law to protect us from rent increases. If not, we all have to move to another city.

JULICE HARTOUNIAN

Glendale

Comparing leaders is apples to oranges

I have been following the presidential crises at Glendale Community College (“GCC leader takes new job,” May 8), and I am concerned about the current arguments about Audre Levy.

The way I see it, John Davitt was the “nice father” who gave freely of his time and affection. Levy, because of her attempt at reigning under the new California budget constraints, was treated like “the ugly stepmother” who immediately replaced our “Cinderella daddy.”

I think it is unfair to compare the two leaders, and each should be applauded for their unique and hard-thought-out contributions.

YVETTE ALAHDADI

Glendale

Armenians are omnipresent

Like other Armenians, I migrated to this country seeking a better life and a better opportunity. I live in Glendale, where there are about 85,000 Armenians.

Armenians are spread all over the world in countries such as Iran, Lebanon, Iraq, and also in the former Soviet Union due to the genocide of 1915. At every corner of the city one can come across restaurants where typical Armenian food is served.

Armenians are involved in community activities, events, and entertainments. We have our church on Central Avenue named St. Mary’s, which enables us to practice our religion that was forbidden in my native country, the former Soviet Armenia.

For decades we were preached atheism. Here, Armenians dominate Glendale city functions and exercise their rights, freedom of speech, and achieve higher education, which was difficult to obtain in our native countries.

There are many privileges in this city that will lead one to a brighter future.

One of them is Glendale Community College. It is one of the nation’s greatest campuses, as it opens its doors to a higher education for all.

Glendale is a safe city. We Armenians contribute to the city’s blooming and advancement.

Summarizing, I can say that I’m glad that I live in the city of Glendale.

God bless America. It gave us an opportunity to exercise our freedom.

DIANA KESHISHYAN

Glendale

Prop 1A will feed the beast further

Don’t believe all the lies and misinformation in the ads coming from the Sacramento politicians and unions about why you should vote for Prop 1A. Make no mistake, the “spending cap” is only a smoke screen for a two-year extension of the tax increase they’ve already imposed on us. Two additional years of the sales tax increase, the gasoline tax increase, the auto license fee increase and the personal income tax increase!

Every time there’s a “budget crisis” in California it’s always the police, fire, libraries, parks and schools that are supposedly going to be shut down. But never the “perks” and benefits that the political hacks enjoy.

Indeed, just three weeks ago Assembly Speaker Karen Bass awarded pay raises to all of the Legislature’s staff in spite of the “doom and gloom” economic crisis we’re in. Of course as soon as “we” found out, she quickly withdrew them with a “golly gee, we didn’t think you’d notice” attitude.

Or how about the report that came out last week about all the “commissions” and “boards” whose apparent only purpose is to provide a steady income to termed-out legislators. These people meet once a month on average, and many get in excess of $100,000 a year for their minimal effort.

No, first show me some serious effort to live within a budget, a serious effort to get rid of all the waste and fraud in Sacramento.

Then, and only then, will I vote for an extension of the tax increase.

Giving these Sacramento politicians money is like giving a bottle of whiskey and car keys to a teenager. They have no self control.

Starve the beast in Sacramento. Vote no on Prop 1A.

TRENT D. SANDERS

La Cañada Flintridge

Anti-smoking laws will benefit city

The front page of your May 8 issue highlights the subject matter of the “strict” anti-smoking restrictions that will be enforced in Glendale after a six-month public education campaign (“Smoking laws get air time,” May 8).

The anti-smoking limitation has been a subject of discussion between its opponents and its proponents in the City Council.

I say “no” to smoking and “yes” to the anti-smoking restrictions in Glendale, praising our City Council for taking a step forward in that subject matter.

Most people, like me, do not want to be second-hand smokers. Consequently, it will be of a great magnitude championing the anti-smoking plan, for it is a fight for our health and the future generation’s health by providing a cleaner environment and fresher air. The new enforcement will bring changes to Glendale geared toward a better city.

SANDRA KLANJIAN

Glendale


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