Dean Starkman

Writer

Dean Starkman previously covered Wall Street for the Los Angeles Times; he left in 2016. An award-winning journalist and media critic, he is the author of 2014's “The Watchdog That Didn’t Bark: The Financial Crisis and the Disappearance of Investigative Journalism,” an analysis of business-press failures prior to the 2008 financial crisis. Starkman most recently ran the Columbia Journalism Review’s business section, “The Audit,”  and was also an Investigative Fund fellow at the Nation Institute. He has been lead editor of “The Best Business Writing” series. His work has also appeared in the New Republic, the Nation, Mother Jones and Washington Monthly, among other publications. An investigative reporter for more than two decades, Starkman covered white-collar crime and real estate for the Wall Street Journal and helped lead the Providence Journal’s investigative team to a Pulitzer Prize in 1994. 

Recent Articles

  • CalPERS paid $3.4 billion in private equity bonuses since 1990

    CalPERS paid $3.4 billion in private equity bonuses since 1990

    In a much-anticipated disclosure, the California Public Employees’ Retirement System said it paid $3.4 billion in performance fees to its private equity managers since 1990 while the controversial sector generated $24.2 billion in profits for retirees. The nation's largest public pension system...

  • Stock markets show resilience despite Paris attacks, other geopolitical risks

    Stock markets show resilience despite Paris attacks, other geopolitical risks

    Stock markets have been largely uneventful this year, save for the huge drops in August, and they showed through last week's terrorist attacks in Paris a remarkable characteristic: resilience. The markets had plenty of reasons to crater even before the horrific attacks added a new layer of geopolitical...

  • Experts defend CalPERS' private equity investments

    Experts defend CalPERS' private equity investments

    The nation's largest public pension fund would have endured lower returns and higher volatility over the years had it not invested in private equity, even with its high fees and added risks, experts testified Monday. At a daylong workshop before the investment committee of the California Public...

  • Are private equity investments worth the risk? CalPERS to weigh pros and cons

    Are private equity investments worth the risk? CalPERS to weigh pros and cons

    The nation's largest public pension fund will take a deep look Monday into its private equity investments, against a backdrop of growing criticism over the risky and controversial sector. The California Public Employees' Retirement System has devoted about $28 billion, or nearly 10% of its total...

  • Bitcoin bounces back, boosted by Wall Street and China

    Bitcoin bounces back, boosted by Wall Street and China

    NEW YORK — Long off the public radar, digital payment network bitcoin has been gaining momentum this fall, bolstering the views of some advocates that bitcoins will be a mainstream currency worldwide in the not-too-distant future. The value of a bitcoin surged to more than $400 last week from its...

  • Pimco moves to dismiss Bill Gross' employment suit

    Pimco moves to dismiss Bill Gross' employment suit

    Pacific Investment Management Co. urged a state court on Monday to dismiss the wrongful termination claim of its co-founder and former star portfolio manager, Bill Gross, calling the suit "a legally groundless and sad postscript to what had been a storied career." In a 20-page motion, Pimco said...

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