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The COVID-19 vaccine made by Moderna caused very few cases of severe allergic reactions during the first three weeks of its nationwide rollout, the CDC says.

Monoclonal antibody treatment is now available to COVID-19 patients, but only about 30% of the delivered doses have been administered.

Coronavirus mutations are on the rise. The longer it takes to vaccinate people, the more likely we’ll see a variant that eludes our tests, treatments and vaccines.

Health officials set aside carefully considered plans for rolling out COVID-19 vaccines and made the shots widely available. That may hasten the pandemic’s end.

Many teachers, grocers and even some hospital employees are wary of the COVID-19 vaccine and don’t want it. The question of mandatory vaccine requirements by employers is complicated.

In an early safety study, Johnson & Johnson’s one-shot COVID-19 vaccine produced immune proteins in more than 90% of participants.

An ongoing study suggests older Americans are showing resilience and perseverance despite struggles with loneliness and isolation amid the pandemic.

More Americans are now eligible to get a COVID-19 vaccine, but they may still have to wait for their first shot even as supplies increase. Here’s a closer look.

The coronavirus strain from the U.K. is now in at least nine U.S. states. Given its ability to spread, scientists expect that number to rise soon.

The demand for oxygen has skyrocketed, as critically ill COVID-19 patients often need high rates of oxygen flowing into their lungs to keep them alive.

British scientists have bolstered their case that the new coronavirus variant spreads more easily than its predecessors. It could be worse in the U.S., they warn.

On Thursday and Friday, L.A. County reported 18,764 coronavirus cases and 17,827 cases, respectively, significantly above the average of last week.

The COVID-19 vaccines in the U.S. require two shots taken weeks apart, and you’ll be given a record card so you’ll know when to return for the second dose.

Covid-19 Vaccines

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