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The University of California on Thursday unveiled a plan to raise tuition for incoming class of freshmen and transfer students, but then freeze it for six years.
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Foreign purchases of U.S. residential real estate fell 36% to the lowest annual rate since 2013, as slowing overseas economies, the strong dollar and the White House’s anti-immigrant rhetoric put a chill on demand.
A coalition of skid row advocates accused Los Angeles of wanting to give the bulk of skid row over to luxury housing developers, ignoring the thousands of people living in tents and shelters in the blighted downtown district.
When Eric Garcetti ran for mayor six years ago, he rode a wave of anger over the political power wielded by the union that represents workers at the Department of Water and Power — and later vowed to reform the agency that Los Angeles residents love to hate.
Property owners and residents of shelters on skid row are going to court to block a contentious legal settlement that restricts Los Angeles’ ability to clear homeless encampments in the heavily blighted downtown district.
As of this week, landlords of Los Angeles rent-controlled buildings can raise rent by 4%, the first time in a decade the annual cap isn’t 3%.
Apartments and condominiums for the middle class could be coming to skid row, under a rezoning plan unveiled Tuesday.
For years, President Trump has taken pleasure in beating up on his archnemesis of California, even when his attacks don’t align with the facts.
More than a decade ago, Los Angeles stopped putting people in jail for sleeping in the streets — a compromise laid out in a court settlement that halted police enforcement of laws barring encampments in public spaces until the city could build more housing for homeless people.
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Climate & Environment
A biological finding by the National Marine Fisheries Service threatens to derail the Trump administration plan to increase Delta water deliveries to Central Valley farmers.
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