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Geoffrey Mohan

Writer

Geoff joined the Los Angeles Times in 2001 from Newsday, where he was a Latin American correspondent in Mexico City. He was hired as a statewide roamer, but was quickly drafted into coverage of Afghanistan and Iraq wars. Soon after returning, he was sent out to the front lines of the California wildfires, and was part of the Pulitzer Prize-winning breaking news team in 2003. Looking for a break from the action, he took refuge behind the editing desks in foreign and metro, serving as the environment editor and later, the state editor. He returned to reporting two years ago in Science, where he’s been writing about Ebola, African-clawed frogs and mathematicians who can predict NCAA winners. Now he’s coming full circle, back to roaming the state in search of stories about farmers, drought and innovation in agriculture and food science.

Recent Articles

  • Reindeer name games: Is it Donder or Donner?

    Reindeer name games: Is it Donder or Donner?

    Farm agencies are not about to be outdone by U.S. air defense officials when it comes to altering policies to aid Santa and his reindeer. Both the state and federal bureaucracies that control cross-border movement of livestock issued their annual waivers Wednesday so that Santa can visit U.S. and...

  • Sonoma County flooded with water complaints

    Sonoma County flooded with water complaints

    The state Water Resources Control Board has rained a record number of complaints down on residents of Sonoma County over failure to comply with an order requesting information on their well use. The board sent 1,881 notices of violation, which could lead to fines of $2,500 apiece, to residents...

  • Wild bees are least abundant where they're most needed, study says

    Wild bees are least abundant where they're most needed, study says

    Without bees, there would be no California almonds. But the Central Valley's love affair with almonds and other orchard crops has left the area with a steep imbalance between wild bee populations and the need for the pollination services they provide, according to a study published online Monday...

  • Pesticides as bad for kids' lungs as cigarette smoke, study says

    Pesticides as bad for kids' lungs as cigarette smoke, study says

    Chronic exposure to pesticides can damage children's lung function by about as much as secondhand cigarette smoke does, according to a study of farmworker children in the Salinas Valley. The long-term study of 279 children from farmworker families is the first to suggest that even being one step...

  • El Niño could be a boon or a blow to California vineyards

    El Niño could be a boon or a blow to California vineyards

    Jason Haas' plan for El Niño involves oats, sweet peas, vetch, clover, sheep, alpacas, a llama and a couple of donkeys. It's not for everyone, the organic viticulturist admits. But it works for his family's Paso Robles vineyard, where dormant vines have laid bare acre after acre of precious topsoil...

  • What does that Thanksgiving meal cost?

    What does that Thanksgiving meal cost?

    Just a smidgen more. The oft-heard phrase for second helpings at the Thanksgiving table applies equally to the cost of the meal. The tab for the feast edged up less than a dollar from last year, and has increased about $21 since Ronald Reagan was midway through his second presidential term. Don’t...

  • EPA bans sale of pesticide that's toxic to honey bees

    EPA bans sale of pesticide that's toxic to honey bees

    It's the end of the line for sulfoxaflor, a pesticide used on a wide array of produce, but that has been found to be toxic to honey bees that are crucial to pollination of crops. The federal Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday officially prohibited further sales and distribution of the...

  • Fed rule would ban widely used nerve-agent pesticide

    Fed rule would ban widely used nerve-agent pesticide

    Federal regulators on Friday proposed a zero-tolerance policy for food-borne residues of a pesticide widely used on edible crops nationwide, effectively ending its application to more than a dozen crops, including tree nuts, soybeans, corn, wheat, apples and citrus. The U.S. Environmental Protection...

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