Scott Gold

Writer

Scott Gold is a former senior writer at the Los Angeles Times. Scott grew up in Charlottesville, Va., then graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a degree in journalism and a concentration in anthropology. He wrote for newspapers in North Carolina and Florida before joining The Times in 1999. Since then, he has covered a series of national news events, including the Bush-Gore recount in 2000, the terrorist attacks in 2001, the loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia in 2003, Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and Hurricane Sandy in 2012. He left The Times in 2015. 

Recent Articles

  • Teen's death aboard party bus focuses attention on a booming industry

    Teen's death aboard party bus focuses attention on a booming industry

    Amy Zisette is still trying to piece together what happened that warm July night. There was music. Dancing. And unspeakable tragedy. She does know that had she had been driving down the 405 Freeway and seen a bunch of teenagers standing up on an open-air, double-decker bus — so high they had to...

  • Remembering the reign of Griffith Park's king

    Remembering the reign of Griffith Park's king

    Sol Shankman always said that what he did was easy: Set his alarm for 5 a.m., wake up five minutes before it goes off, walk out the front door and into the hills of Los Angeles, hope for nice weather and make a few friends along the way. And maybe that was true, in the beginning. Maybe even after...

  • Amid California's drought, many wildfires but no disasters — yet

    Amid California's drought, many wildfires but no disasters — yet

    With California zeroing in on a thousand days of drought, people here shifted their gaze this week with a sense of dreadful certainty, from the cracked soil and parched tinderbox at their feet toward a plume of smoke rising from the woods somewhere off Quail Drive. It was one year ago, after all,...

  • Storms that caused deadly Southern California mudslides push north

    Storms that caused deadly Southern California mudslides push north

    Thunderstorms that wreaked havoc in portions of the mountains and deserts of San Bernardino County have headed north, forecasters said, giving residents a chance to recover from flash floods that killed one person and left thousands temporarily stranded The system of thick, slow-moving storms is...

  • Thunderstorms kill 1, submerge cars in San Bernardino County

    Thunderstorms kill 1, submerge cars in San Bernardino County

    Thunderstorms wreaked havoc in portions of the mountains and desert of San Bernardino County on Sunday, killing one person, clogging key access roads with rocks and mud, submerging cars and prompting “shelter in place” orders for at least 3,000 people. One person was killed in the Bear Creek community,...

  • Storms hit San Bernardino County, causing flooding, water rescues

    Storms hit San Bernardino County, causing flooding, water rescues

    Swirling cells of thunderstorms wreaked havoc in parts of the mountains and desert of San Bernardino County on Sunday, clogging key access roads with rocks and mud, submerging cars and prompting a “shelter in place” order for at least 3,000 people. By nightfall, there had been no serious injuries...

  • Annenberg Foundation donating $500,000 to assure water for center

    Annenberg Foundation donating $500,000 to assure water for center

    The Annenberg Foundation said it will donate $500,000 to keep the water flowing at a home for developmentally disabled adults in the Santa Clarita area. Wallis Annenberg, the philanthropic foundation’s president and chief executive, decided to make the contribution after reading about a water crisis...

  • Thousand Oaks redevelopment sparks public outcry to save the trees

    Thousand Oaks redevelopment sparks public outcry to save the trees

    There are trees, and then, when you grow up in a city called Thousand Oaks, there are trees. The oak tree isn't just in the city seal; it's in the city's DNA. When Yvonne Brockwell was growing up, the trees were ingrained in her schooling. She learned how the native Chumash people once used heated...

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